AstronoMay and more at PacSci

It’s been a month filled with astronomy at Pacific Science Center, and they’ll wrap it up big this weekend with their celebration of AstronoMay Saturday, Sunday, and Monday. According to Dave Cuomo, supervisor for science interpretation programs and the Willard Smith Planetarium at the center, there will be a lot going on.

“We will have expanded planetarium shows,” Cuomo said. “We will have lectures about astronomy featured on our Science on a Sphere exhibit. We will talk about astrobiology in some of those. We will have space scientists that visitors can speak with and talk about their study and research about astronomy. And, weather permitting, we will have some solar telescopes out so you can safely observe the Sun.”

Planetarium-palooza

Willard Smith PlanetariumThere’s a great variety of selections for shows in the planetarium. One that will run this weekend is called “The Search for Life.”

“It will be an exploration of the different ways that astrobiologists are looking for life, both in the solar system and outside of the solar system,” Cuomo said. That show is a great complement to the “Mission: Find Life!” exhibit about astrobiology that is presently in the center’s Portal to Current Research space. (See our post from last month for more about that.) Another show, titled “Let’s Explore Light,” is about the basic physics of light.

A third planetarium show called “The Skies of Ancient China,” created to complement the popular Terracotta Warriors exhibit at the center, looks at more than 4,000 years of Chinese astronomy. Cuomo noted that Chinese astronomers in the day had a pretty high-stakes job.

“They were hired by the emperor because the emperor ruled the Earth because he had the mandate from the heavens,” Cuomo explained, “so he needed to be able to know what was going to happen in the sky.”

The astronomers predicted planetary conjunctions and eclipses of the Sun and the Moon. Conjunctions in particular were considered omens of pending regime change, and, say what you will about whether the heavens influence lives on Earth, a couple of empires actually did flip at around the time of a conjunction. More amazing is the accuracy of both the Chinese astronomical observations and their record keeping.

“Modern astronomers have associated at least nine supernova remnants with ‘guest stars’ that the Chinese observed and recorded the location of,” Cuomo marveled. “There is also almost two thousand years of history of a returning star every 76 years, which we now know was Halley’s Comet.”

Cuomo found it interesting that there wasn’t much mythology around the heavens with the Chinese astronomers as compared to that in many other cultures. He and three of the center’s planetarians created the show with research help from the British Library, the Hong Kong Space Museum, and many others across the country and the world.

The daily schedule for planetarium shows is on the PacSci website and also on our Seattle Astronomy calendar page. We saw “The Skies of Ancient China” last week and found it to be exceptionally well done.

Solar eclipse

The astronomy doesn’t stop once May ends. The Pacific Science Center is gearing up for the total solar eclipse that will happen on August 21. The entire month of August will be PacSci “Up in the Sky.”

“We will talk about solar astronomy, observational astronomy, weather; anything that you look up to see, we’ll want to talk about,” Cuomo said. They’ll also have eclipse glasses on hand for safe viewing of the Sun, and probably some solar projectors for watching the eclipse.

Although the eclipse will only be partial in Seattle, the center plans to open early, at 8:30, that morning.

“We will have solar telescopes available and educators talking about the eclipse and the science of the eclipse,” Cuomo said. First contact—when the Moon starts moving across the face of the Sun—will happen at 9:08 a.m. at PacSci, and it will be over by 11:30. But they’ll have live feeds from other eclipse events from all across the country so you can keep watching.

Cuomo will be in Madras, Oregon for the total eclipse, along with other educators from the Pacific Science Center in partnership with Lowell Observatory. They’re leading a four-day trip to view the total eclipse. Space is limited; if you’re interested in going along, you can find out more online.


Podcast of our interview with Dave Cuomo

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