Category Archives: astronomy

Don’t forget about the Perseid meteor shower

The astronomically growing hullabaloo about this month’s total solar eclipse is threatening to outshine one of our coolest annual celestial events: the Perseid meteor shower. The shower has actually been going on for a couple of weeks now, but will reach its peak this weekend. The best viewing of the shower is expected late Friday evening, August 11 through the wee hours of Saturday morning, and again on Saturday night and into Sunday morning.

Perseids

Image: NASA

The Perseids are so named because they seem to originate from the constellation Perseus. The meteors are specks of material left behind by the comet Swift-Tuttle that burn up as they hit Earth’s atmosphere.

There’s good news and bad news about this year’s Perseids. The good is that it looks like we’ll be going through a particularly dense part of the comet’s debris tail, so we could get more meteors than usual. The bad news is that the waning gibbous Moon will be casting its bright light in the early morning hours, washing out some of the fainter meteors. But even with a bright Moon out, the most robust of the meteors can be spotted, even from city skies.

I’m often asked where to go to see the Perseids. In answer to that, I’ve created a Stargazing Sites page on Seattle Astronomy. The page features maps of stargazing spots in Seattle and around the Northwest. This has been up in “soft launch” mode for a while now, so this is our first public call-out. Check the maps for a site near you, and please feel free to ping me with your own favorites.

The short story for Perseid watching: get as far away from city lights as possible. I first saw them when I was about 12 years old and on a backpacking trip in the dark wilderness near Holden, west of Lake Chelan. The show in pitch-black skies was spectacular. I didn’t know there was such a thing as the Perseids; it was just luck being in the right place at the right time. If you have to stay in the city, find a spot away from street lights for the best prospects.

This article from EarthSky has some useful tips for viewing the Perseids. Good luck!

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Astro Biz: Rockstar Energy Drink

Rockstar Energy DrinkMany businesses, products, and places have names rooted in space and astronomy. We’re featuring one every Tuesday on Seattle Astronomy.

This week’s Astro Biz is Rockstar Energy Drink. According to the company website, “Rockstar Energy Drink is designed for those who lead active lifestyles – from Athletes to Rock Stars.” They cater strongly to those involved in action sports, motor sports, and music. I didn’t find any references to astronomy on the site, and the hobby, which involves sitting outside at 2 a.m. looking through a telescope, doesn’t necessarily evoke images of “active lifestyle.” Still, someone in that situation might like a little pick-me-up. Usually it’s something warmer, though.

More info:

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We were on KING TV this morning talking solar eclipses

Seattle Astronomy‘s Greg Scheiderer was on the KING 5 television program New Day Northwest today for a segment about viewing solar eclipses! It was a fun time, and an enthusiastic studio audience had lots of questions after the recording. They just about had to drag me off in order to record the next segment!

Alas, fame is fleeting—they spelled my name wrong in the graphics on the program. That’s not what George M. Cohan (or maybe Oscar Wilde) suggested.

If you missed it, the video is below.

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Making beer and weighing stars

Science these days is often all about interdisciplinary work. It’s seldom just biology or just geology, and so it wasn’t surprising that the most recent gathering of Astronomy on Tap Seattle had a heavy dose of chemistry. It was for a good cause, though, as Trevor Dorn-Wallenstein, a second-year graduate student in the University of Washington Astronomy Department, gave a talk titled “An Unbeerlievable Tale” explaining how the universe made us beer, and a glass to put it into. The event happened July 26 at Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard.

It turns out you only need five elements for beer:

  • hydrogen
  • nitrogen
  • carbon
  • oxygen
  • phosphorous
Trevor Dorn-Wallenstein

Trevor Dorn-Wallenstein talks about celestial beermaking at Astronomy on Tap Seattle July 26, 2017 at Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard. (Photo: Greg Scheiderer)

We had the hydrogen about a millionth of a second after the Big Bang.

“It’s not until 10 seconds after the big bang that we can smoosh a proton and a neutron together and have deuterium and have that deuterium last,” Dorn-Wallenstein said. “Once we have that deuterium though, we’re off to the races.”

If you add a proton to the deuterium you make helium 3, or add a neutron and make tritium. Add the missing nucleon to either and you’ve got helium 4. It’s not in beer, but we’ll need it later. Much later. We have to wait about 1.5 million years, until stars start to form and start fusing new elements. Stars about two times the mass of our Sun can fuse hydrogen into helium, then toward the end of their life cylcles do what Dorn-Wallenstein called the “triple alpha reaction.” They smash three helium atoms into carbon, and add another helium nucleus to make oxygen. When the star reaches its red giant phase these elements blow off with the stellar wind.

“We’ve pollulted the interstellar medium with hydrogen, with carbon, with oxygen,” Dorn-Wallenstein said, “three of the things we need to make beer.”

Higher-mass stars, say ten times the mass of the Sun, can fuse things such as neon, titanium, silicon, sulfur, magnesium, aluminum, and calcium.

“It can unlock all of these additional stages of nuclear fusion,” Dorn-Wallenstein said.

Nickel beer night

The process leaves behind a stellar core of nickel 56 which decays into iron 56.

“Iron 56 is the end of the line for a star,” Dorn-Wallenstein explained. “There is no physical way to get energy out of an iron 56 nucleus. You cant fuse it with something else, you can’t fission it and turn it into two more things, you get nothing out of this nucleus. That’s a problem for a star.”

The outer part of the star collapses onto the core and explodes into supernova, blasting all of the elements it has made out into the interstellar medium.

“The environment around this supernova explosion is so energetic that you can make pretty much anything you want,” Dorn-Wallenstein said. “Pick any element in the periodic table that’s heavier than iron—it’s probably made in a supernova.”

Nitrogen is conspicuously missing from the list, and it is kind of hard to make. Dorn-Wallenstein said we get a little bit, but not enough, from supernovae or at the end of a smaller star’s life.

“The only way to produce enough nitrogen is via this thing called the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen, or CNO, cycle,” he said, explaining that this is how stars produce helium from hydrogen. Since nitrogen takes longer, it builds up in stars. In the universe at large there are about four or five carbon atoms for every nitrogen atom, but in a star that’s doing the CNO cycle there are more than a hundred times more nitrogen atoms than carbon.

“Via this process of converting hydrogen into helium, we actually make nitrogen as a by-product,” Dorn-Wallenstein said.

The beer glass

We’ve got the ingredients for beer. Where do we put it?

“It turns out the most complicated thing that goes into a beer is the glass itself,” Dorn-Wallenstein said, noting that your mug is mostly silicon dioxide, with a bit of sodium oxide, aluminum oxide, calcium oxide, and trace amounts of potassium, magnesium, iron, titanium, and sulfur. All of that stuff came out of a supernovae.

We have all we need for beer. Now we just need a planet to form, simple life forms like yeast to emerge, wheat and hops to grow, and someone to mix it all into a barrel and let it sit for a while.

“Look at that; we’ve made beer,” Dorn-Wallenstein concluded.

Weighing stars

The second talk of the evening at Astronomy on Tap Seattle was given by Dr. Meredith Rawls, who spoke about “Weighing Stars with Starquakes.” Rawls employs asteroseismology—your word of the day!—to figure out the mass of stars.

Rawls

Dr. Meredith Rawls discussed a new method for determining the masses of stars at Astronomy on Tap Seattle. (Photo: Greg Scheiderer)

Rawls noted that one way to calculate the mass of a star is to observe binary systems. We can measure the blockage of light as the stars orbit each other, and the Doppler shift that occurs when they do. Combine those two measurements and you get a reliable measure of the stars’ masses.

The drawbacks, according to Rawls, are that not all stars are part of binary systems, and that this method is slow and uses a lot of limited telescope time. Rawls gets around this by using asteroseismology, measuring the oscillations, or starquakes, that occur in a star’s interior. They actually ring like a bell, though you can’t hear it because space is a vacuum, and the frequency is too low in any case. Like a bell, the more massive the star, the lower the frequency of the oscillation. You can’t see the oscillations because they’re inside the star, but they change the star’s brightness. This is something that can be observed, and astronomers chart brightness changes against the frequencies of the starquakes and see how they line up with other properties of the star.

“You fit a bunch of curves to a bunch of wiggles and you try to convince yourself you’re not making it up,” Rawls quipped. The method can give clues about a star’s surface gravity, density, and temperature, and with gravity and density you can calculate mass.

Does it really work?

Rawls said they like to study red giant stars for a couple of reasons: that’s the eventual state of our Sun, and red giants brighter and easier to see. After figuring masses of many red giants with asteroseismology, they went back and calculated them again using the binary method. Then they compared the two.

“Oh, crap!” was Rawls’s reaction upon seeing how they matched up. “It’s not one-to-one. I broke science!”

In fact, the masses calculated through asteroseismology differed from those returned by the binary method by about 16 percent, on average. It turns out that big, red giant stars are not quite so simply just huge versions of our Sun.

“They have their own weird convection stuff going on,” Rawls explained. “There’s different stuff happening in different layers of the star that isn’t quite the same as what happens inside our Sun, and it’s just complicated enough that you can’t compare them one to one, even though it would be super handy if you could.”

What do they do to reconcile the differences between the two methods?

“We have to apply empirical corrections in order to get accurate masses,” Rawls explained. In other words, “We have to fudge it a little bit! But it’s consistent. It’s fine, it’s fine. Totally works. Not a problem. Don’t worry about it,” she laughed, adding that asteroseismology works just great for smaller stars like the Sun.

“It’s actually really useful, even though sometimes it doesn’t always work perfectly, because you can measure a lot of stars’ masses really fast,” she concluded.

Astronomy on Tap Seattle is organized by graduate students in astronomy from the University of Washington.


Some photos from recent Astronomy on Tap gatherings, and videos of the July talks:

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Astro Biz: Orbit Irrigation

Orbit IrrigationMany businesses, products, and places have names rooted in space and astronomy. We’re featuring one every Tuesday on Seattle Astronomy.

This week’s Astro Biz is the Orbit Irrigation timer. Orbit is a Utah-based company that makes a variety of products for home garden irrigation, including sprinkler systems, drip irrigation, hose irrigation, and related items.

The gardens at Seattle Astronomy world headquarters employ several of these to keep our plants happy.

More info:

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Astronomy on Tap plus Nordgren eclipse talk highlight week’s events

Another episode of Astronomy on Tap Seattle is on the calendar for this week, and astronomer, artist, and author Tyler Nordgren will visit the Museum of Flight to talk about his latest book about total solar eclipses.

The whole premise of Astronomy on Tap is that astronomy is even better with beer. This month we go even one step further, learning how beer isn’t possible without science as we go “From Stars to Beer.” The gathering will be at 8 p.m. Wednesday, July 26 at Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard.

AoT co-host Trevor Dorn-Wallenstein will give a talk titled, “An Unbeerlievable Tale: How atoms come together in stars to make the most glorious structure in the low-redshift universe: beer.” That may be the longest subtitle ever, too! Dr. Meredith Rawls will discuss her research about “Weighing Stars with Starquakes” with a fantastic technique called asteroseismology.

Astronomy on Tap Seattle is organized by graduate students in astronomy at the University of Washington. It’s free, but buy beer. Bring your own chair to create premium front-row seating in Peddler’s outdoor beer garden.

Nordgren on Eclipses

We’ve covered a number of talks by Tyler Nordgren over the last several years. Nordgren, astronomy professor at the University of Redlands, is also an author, artist, dark-sky advocate, and entertaining presenter. He’ll be at the Museum of Flight at 2 p.m. Saturday, July 29 to talk about his latest book, Sun Moon Earth: The History of Solar Eclipses (Basic Books, 2016).

The book is part travelogue covering some of Nordgren’s recent eclipse-chasing adventures, part history of eclipses and the myths and science surrounding them, and part primer for the total solar eclipse that will be visible from the United States next month. It’s a marvelous volume and we recommend it highly.

Nordgren spoke about the book at Town Hall Seattle back in January. You can read our re-cap of that talk and our review of the book. Nordgren will sign copies of Sun Moon Earth following his talk Saturday. Grab the book by clicking the book cover or link above; it helps Seattle Astronomy exist!

Star parties galore

The Seattle Astronomical Society will be involved in three star parties this weekend. The Covington Community Park star party will be held at 10 p.m. Friday, July 28 in said park. Volunteers from the Boeing and Tacoma societies also help out with this event.

SAS will hold its free monthly public star parties at 9 p.m. Saturday, July 29 at two locations: Green Lake in Seattle and Paramount Park in Shoreline. Bad weather cancels these star parties, so watch the SAS website or social media for updates. But hey, we’re on a good-weather roll!

Jazz Under the Stars

Jazz Under the StarsThe Tacoma Astronomical Society and Pacific Lutheran University physics department will lead stargazing at PLU’s Keck Observatory on Thursday, July 27 following the PLU Jazz Under the Stars concert. The artist for the free concert, which begins at 7 p.m. in the outdoor amphitheater of the Mary Baker Russell Music Center at PLU, is Anjali Natarajan, a Brazilian jazz vocalist out of Olympia. If the weather is bad the stargazing may be off, but the concert will just move indoors.

Jazz Under the Stars concerts will also be held on the next two Thursdays, August 3 and 10.


 

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Two chicks and a cool eclipse product

An Oregon-based company has created a fun item to commemorate the upcoming total solar eclipse. Two Chicks Conspiracy is selling a fashionable key ring and fob that features an image of a total solar eclipse.

The two chicks are Kimberly Kelly and Joanna Rosinska, who founded Two Chicks Conspiracy, a casual fashion accessory company, back in 2013.

“It actually all started because I needed a new belt,” Kelly said. The company had some stops and starts because it was difficult to find a U.S.-based manufacturer that could do the sublimation—printing on polyester webbing—that was needed to make their creative belts. They finally found a company in Alabama that would work with them at their relatively modest production level.

The bulk of Two Chicks Conspiracy’s products are belts that are really wearable art, with designs based on nature and native culture as well as cityscapes and activities such as cycling. They have several designs that are space themed, which came about because of Rosinska’s personal interest in both astrology and astronomy.

Solar Eclipse key fob“Gazing into the night sky is good for the soul,” she said.

The company is based in Albany, Oregon, which is within the path of totality for the August 21, 2017 solar eclipse, and so a product featuring the eclipse seemed a natural. Kelly and Rosinska have used the smartphone app Solar Eclipse Timer to scope out a good nearby viewing spot for eclipse day.

Check out Two Chicks Conspiracy for some cool products made in the USA.


Two Chicks Conspiracy is a Seattle Astronomy advertiser.

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