Category Archives: calendar

Calendar: Six NW astro-club meetings this week

Orbit Around October continues at the Museum of Flight, and there are a slew of astronomy club meetings on the calendar for this week.

Orbit

Orbit Around OctoberThe Museum of Flight continues its spacey month with a visit to Ceres at 2 p.m. Saturday, October 21. Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab participating scientist Debra Buczkowski will talk about the discoveries of NASA’s Dawn mission to the giant asteroid Vesta and dwarf planet Ceres. Buczkowski will discuss what we learned about Vesta and Ceres, and how this helps us understand the formation of bodies in the asteroid belt. Free with museum admission.

Star party in Oak Harbor

The Island County Astronomical Society plans its monthly star party in Fort Nugent Park for around dusk on Friday, October 20.

Haunted night sky

The popular planetarium show Haunted Night Sky continues on Saturdays through October at the Pierce College Science Dome. Show times for October 21 are 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m., and the program runs about 45 minutes. The show is designed for kids ages 3–12. Tickets are $6 for children, free for adults, and are available online.

Astronomy club meetings

There are half a dozen astronomy club meetings in the region this week:

Mark your calendar

The next Astronomy on Tap Seattle event is set for 7 p.m. Wednesday, October 25 at Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard. The theme will be “A Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxies” and the evening will feature talks about galaxy types, formation, and evolution. Plus beer and astronomy trivia.

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Calendar: Orbit around October

A month of space and astronomy events are on the calendar at the Museum of Flight, with three events kicking it all off this week.

Orbit Around October

Orbit Around OctoberThe museum’s space month is dubbed Orbit Around October, with new events on Saturdays during the month.

It all starts off on October 5 with Astronomy Night during the museum’s monthly Free First Thursday. There’s no admission charge between 5 p.m. and 9 p.m. Area astronomy clubs will be on hand with telescopes and information, and there will be other educational activities throughout the evening.

The museum also offers a couple of events on Saturday, October 7. A 2 p.m. presentation called “21st Century Communities in Space: The Cultural Details in Living Away From Earth” will celebrate the 60th anniversary of Sputnik, and then look forward to the future when we’ve colonized the Moon and Mars and are creating communities in space. What sort of culture will be there?

Then at 5:30 p.m. join in on a reception, lecture, and book signing with space writer Leonard David. David’s book Mars: Our Future on the Red Planet (National Geographic, 2016) is a companion to the recent Mars miniseries produced by the National Geographic Channel. Tickets to this event are $25, $20 for museum members, and must be purchased online by October 3.

Haunted Night Sky

The Pierce College Science Dome brings back the popular planetarium show Haunted Night Sky on Saturdays during October. The show, geared for kids aged 3-12, guides viewers to use their imaginations to find creatures in the night sky, build a Frankenstein satellite, and take a tour of the Sea of Serpents on the Moon, the Witch’s Head nebula, and other spooky places in the universe. Showtimes are 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. each Saturday, and it runs about 45 minutes. Tickets are $6 for kids—adults are free—and are available in advance online.

Astronomy clubs

A quick rundown of the regional astronomy club meetings this week:

Mark your calendar

You can scout out future astronomy events by visiting our calendar page.


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Calendar: What the heck is polarimetry?

The monthly gathering of Astronomy on Tap Seattle and a variety of star parties highlight this week’s calendar.

AOT

AOT Sept 27My Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary defines polarimeter as “an instrument for determining the amount of polarization of light or the proportion of polarized light in a partially polarized ray.” I still don’t know what that means or why astronomers might be into polarimetry, but we’ll find out at 8 p.m. Wednesday, September 27 when Astronomy on Tap Seattle meets at Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard.

The guest speakers are both UW postdocs: Dr. Jamie Lomax will discuss her research using polarimetry to detect the almost-invisible material around stars, and Dr. Kim Bott will explain how she uses polarimetry to hunt for signs of habitable worlds.

Astronomy on Tap Seattle is organized by graduate students in astronomy at the University of Washington. The evening’s festivities include astronomy-themed trivia and fabulous prizes. It’s free, but buy beer. Bring your own chair to create custom front-row seating.

Star parties

Several star parties are on the calendar for the weekend. The Covington Community Park Star Party is scheduled for 9 p.m. Friday, September 29 at the park. The party is sponsored by Covington Parks and Recreation with support from the Seattle, Tacoma, and Boeing Employees astronomical societies.

The Seattle Astronomical Society plans its free monthly public star parties for 8 p.m. Saturday, September 30 at two locations: Green Lake in Seattle and Paramount Park in Shoreline.

Planetarium

The WSU Planetarium in Pullman offers a new program this weekend, “Astronomy 101.” The show runs at 7 p.m. Friday, September 29 and repeats at 5 p.m. Sunday, October 1. Tickets are $5 at the door, cash or check; no credit cards.

Mark your calendar

The Museum of Flight will observe Astronomy Night next Thursday, October 5 beginning at 5 p.m. Astronomy clubs from the area will be on hand with telescopes and information. It’s part of the museum’s free first Thursday offerings.

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Calendar: TJO wraps open houses for the season

A handful of astronomy club meetings and the final open house of the year at the Theodor Jacobsen Observatory are the highlights of this week’s astronomy calendar.

TJO

Theodor Jacobsen ObservatoryThe University of Washington hosts open houses at the Theodor Jacobsen Observatory on the first and third Wednesdays of each month from April through September. The open house at 8 p.m. this Wednesday, September 20, will be the last for 2017.

UW students give talks at the open houses. We haven’t been plugging these much this year because the free talks have been filled well in advance; the talks are free, but reservations are needed, as the classroom can accommodate just 45 people. Volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society staff the dome and its vintage telescope. There are also typically telescopes on hand outside for those who don’t get a chance to get inside.

Astronomy clubs

A quick rundown of the regional astronomy club meetings this week:

Mark your calendars

One of our favorite monthly events is coming up next week: Astronomy on Tap Seattle will meet at 8 p.m. Wednesday, September 27 at Peddler Brewing in Ballard. The topic will be “What the Heck is Polarimetry?”, and the speakers will be Dr. Jamie Lomax, who will talk about her research on detecting the almost-invisible material around stars, and Dr. Kim Bott, who uses polarimetry to hunt for signs of habitable worlds.

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Astronomy on Tap plus Nordgren eclipse talk highlight week’s events

Another episode of Astronomy on Tap Seattle is on the calendar for this week, and astronomer, artist, and author Tyler Nordgren will visit the Museum of Flight to talk about his latest book about total solar eclipses.

The whole premise of Astronomy on Tap is that astronomy is even better with beer. This month we go even one step further, learning how beer isn’t possible without science as we go “From Stars to Beer.” The gathering will be at 8 p.m. Wednesday, July 26 at Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard.

AoT co-host Trevor Dorn-Wallenstein will give a talk titled, “An Unbeerlievable Tale: How atoms come together in stars to make the most glorious structure in the low-redshift universe: beer.” That may be the longest subtitle ever, too! Dr. Meredith Rawls will discuss her research about “Weighing Stars with Starquakes” with a fantastic technique called asteroseismology.

Astronomy on Tap Seattle is organized by graduate students in astronomy at the University of Washington. It’s free, but buy beer. Bring your own chair to create premium front-row seating in Peddler’s outdoor beer garden.

Nordgren on Eclipses

We’ve covered a number of talks by Tyler Nordgren over the last several years. Nordgren, astronomy professor at the University of Redlands, is also an author, artist, dark-sky advocate, and entertaining presenter. He’ll be at the Museum of Flight at 2 p.m. Saturday, July 29 to talk about his latest book, Sun Moon Earth: The History of Solar Eclipses (Basic Books, 2016).

The book is part travelogue covering some of Nordgren’s recent eclipse-chasing adventures, part history of eclipses and the myths and science surrounding them, and part primer for the total solar eclipse that will be visible from the United States next month. It’s a marvelous volume and we recommend it highly.

Nordgren spoke about the book at Town Hall Seattle back in January. You can read our re-cap of that talk and our review of the book. Nordgren will sign copies of Sun Moon Earth following his talk Saturday. Grab the book by clicking the book cover or link above; it helps Seattle Astronomy exist!

Star parties galore

The Seattle Astronomical Society will be involved in three star parties this weekend. The Covington Community Park star party will be held at 10 p.m. Friday, July 28 in said park. Volunteers from the Boeing and Tacoma societies also help out with this event.

SAS will hold its free monthly public star parties at 9 p.m. Saturday, July 29 at two locations: Green Lake in Seattle and Paramount Park in Shoreline. Bad weather cancels these star parties, so watch the SAS website or social media for updates. But hey, we’re on a good-weather roll!

Jazz Under the Stars

Jazz Under the StarsThe Tacoma Astronomical Society and Pacific Lutheran University physics department will lead stargazing at PLU’s Keck Observatory on Thursday, July 27 following the PLU Jazz Under the Stars concert. The artist for the free concert, which begins at 7 p.m. in the outdoor amphitheater of the Mary Baker Russell Music Center at PLU, is Anjali Natarajan, a Brazilian jazz vocalist out of Olympia. If the weather is bad the stargazing may be off, but the concert will just move indoors.

Jazz Under the Stars concerts will also be held on the next two Thursdays, August 3 and 10.


 

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Good events and maybe actual observing as holiday weekend approaches

We hope you have had a chance to dust off the telescope and get in some observing with the recent good weather. Seattle Astronomy had some fine looks at Jupiter and Saturn over the weekend. The forecast looks promising for some public star parties next weekend, too.

The Seattle Astronomical Society plans its free monthly public star parties for 9 p.m. Saturday, July 1 at two locations: Green Lake in Seattle and Paramount Park in Shoreline. Bad weather cancels these events, so watch the website for updates.

SAS is also involved, along with the Boeing and Tacoma clubs, with the Covington Community Park star party set for 9 p.m. Friday, June 30. This one, too, is weather dependent.

The Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold one of its public nights at 9 p.m. Saturday, July 1 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The indoor program will be about constellations and star-hopping. The telescopes will come out under clear skies.

The Eastside Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 27 at the Newport Way Library in Bellevue. The topic for the night will be the August total solar eclipse. EAS doesn’t meet during the summer, so this will be its last gathering until September.

AOT SeattleAstronomy on Tap Seattle will hold another of its gatherings at Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard at 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 28. The topic for the evening will be CSI: Universe. AOT Seattle co-host Brett Morris will give a presentation titled “The Weirdest Star in the Universe Gets Weirder,” an update on Tabetha Boyajian’s star in light of its recent misbehavior. UW observational astrophysicist Dr. Melissa Graham will speak about her research as “Coroner For The Stars,” working to unravel the mysteries of supernovae.

There’s plenty of time for Q&A and prizes to win in astro-trivia.

It’s free, but buy beer, and bring a chair to create your own front-row seating.

Asteroid Awareness Day is Friday, June 28, and the Museum of Flight will offer educational activities and livestream lectures between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. in its Alaska Airlines Aerospace Education Center.

Also Sprach Zarathustra

The Seattle Symphony is going to show the science fiction classic 2001: A Space Odyssey this weekend, and they’ll be providing some of the music live! Performances are at 8 p.m. this Friday and Saturday, June 30 and July 1. Tickets, available online, range from $38 to $128.


 

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AstronoMay and more at PacSci

It’s been a month filled with astronomy at Pacific Science Center, and they’ll wrap it up big this weekend with their celebration of AstronoMay Saturday, Sunday, and Monday. According to Dave Cuomo, supervisor for science interpretation programs and the Willard Smith Planetarium at the center, there will be a lot going on.

“We will have expanded planetarium shows,” Cuomo said. “We will have lectures about astronomy featured on our Science on a Sphere exhibit. We will talk about astrobiology in some of those. We will have space scientists that visitors can speak with and talk about their study and research about astronomy. And, weather permitting, we will have some solar telescopes out so you can safely observe the Sun.”

Planetarium-palooza

Willard Smith PlanetariumThere’s a great variety of selections for shows in the planetarium. One that will run this weekend is called “The Search for Life.”

“It will be an exploration of the different ways that astrobiologists are looking for life, both in the solar system and outside of the solar system,” Cuomo said. That show is a great complement to the “Mission: Find Life!” exhibit about astrobiology that is presently in the center’s Portal to Current Research space. (See our post from last month for more about that.) Another show, titled “Let’s Explore Light,” is about the basic physics of light.

A third planetarium show called “The Skies of Ancient China,” created to complement the popular Terracotta Warriors exhibit at the center, looks at more than 4,000 years of Chinese astronomy. Cuomo noted that Chinese astronomers in the day had a pretty high-stakes job.

“They were hired by the emperor because the emperor ruled the Earth because he had the mandate from the heavens,” Cuomo explained, “so he needed to be able to know what was going to happen in the sky.”

The astronomers predicted planetary conjunctions and eclipses of the Sun and the Moon. Conjunctions in particular were considered omens of pending regime change, and, say what you will about whether the heavens influence lives on Earth, a couple of empires actually did flip at around the time of a conjunction. More amazing is the accuracy of both the Chinese astronomical observations and their record keeping.

“Modern astronomers have associated at least nine supernova remnants with ‘guest stars’ that the Chinese observed and recorded the location of,” Cuomo marveled. “There is also almost two thousand years of history of a returning star every 76 years, which we now know was Halley’s Comet.”

Cuomo found it interesting that there wasn’t much mythology around the heavens with the Chinese astronomers as compared to that in many other cultures. He and three of the center’s planetarians created the show with research help from the British Library, the Hong Kong Space Museum, and many others across the country and the world.

The daily schedule for planetarium shows is on the PacSci website and also on our Seattle Astronomy calendar page. We saw “The Skies of Ancient China” last week and found it to be exceptionally well done.

Solar eclipse

The astronomy doesn’t stop once May ends. The Pacific Science Center is gearing up for the total solar eclipse that will happen on August 21. The entire month of August will be PacSci “Up in the Sky.”

“We will talk about solar astronomy, observational astronomy, weather; anything that you look up to see, we’ll want to talk about,” Cuomo said. They’ll also have eclipse glasses on hand for safe viewing of the Sun, and probably some solar projectors for watching the eclipse.

Although the eclipse will only be partial in Seattle, the center plans to open early, at 8:30, that morning.

“We will have solar telescopes available and educators talking about the eclipse and the science of the eclipse,” Cuomo said. First contact—when the Moon starts moving across the face of the Sun—will happen at 9:08 a.m. at PacSci, and it will be over by 11:30. But they’ll have live feeds from other eclipse events from all across the country so you can keep watching.

Cuomo will be in Madras, Oregon for the total eclipse, along with other educators from the Pacific Science Center in partnership with Lowell Observatory. They’re leading a four-day trip to view the total eclipse. Space is limited; if you’re interested in going along, you can find out more online.


Podcast of our interview with Dave Cuomo

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