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Lots of great choices for astronomy events this week

There are tons of great astronomy events on the calendar this week, topped by the opening of the Museum of Flight’s Apollo exhibit and a visit from the Night Sky Guy.

Apollo

ApolloA couple of years in the making, the new Apollo exhibit opens Saturday, May 20 at the Museum of Flight, though museum members can get an early sneak-peek Wednesday evening. The exhibit includes the F-1 engine parts fished out of the Atlantic Ocean by Bezos Expeditions, an intact F-1, and many more great space exploration artifacts. Check out our recent article and podcast previewing the exhibit.

The Museum will also hold its annual Space Fest over the weekend with a variety of presentations, exhibits, and discussions focused on Apollo and the Moon.

The Night Sky Guy and Mars

Andrew Fazekas, aka The Night Sky Guy, is in Seattle for three talks at Benaroya Hall. Titled “Mankind to Mars,” the event will be an exploration of what it will take to get humans to the Red Planet. It’s produced in conjunction with the Mars miniseries created by the National Geographic channel. One show was Sunday afternoon, and Fazekas also appears on Monday, May 15 and Tuesday, May 16, both at 7:30 p.m.

Fazekas is the author of Star Trek: The Official Guide to Our Universe: The True Science Behind the Starship Voyages (National Geographic, 2016).

AstronoMay at PacSci

Pacific Science CenterAstronoMay is under way at the Pacific Science Center, and a couple of interesting events are on the calendar for this week. Astronaut Nicholas Patrick will host a viewing and discussion of the film A Beautiful Planet 3-D at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 16. The film is a portrait of Earth from space captured by the astronauts aboard the International Space Station. Patrick will introduce the show and lead a Q&A session after. He’s now with Blue Origin; see our article about Patrick’s recent talk at Astronomy on Tap Seattle. Admission is $10, or $5 for science center members.

Then learn the ABCs of total solar eclipses, and get ready for the one that will be visible in parts of the United States in August, with Dennis Schatz, nationally recognized astronomy educator and Pacific Science Center senior advisor. Total Solar Eclipse 101 happens at 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 17. Cost is $5, free for members.

JWST

RiekeNASA’s next great space observatory, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), is scheduled for launch in October 2018. George Rieke, a professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona and science team lead for the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) that will fly onboard the scope, will speak at the University of Washington astronomy colloquium at 4 p.m. Thursday, May 18. The talk will focus on the capabilities of JWST, emphasizing the advances over present (and even some future) facilities, with examples of the science it will enable.

Club events

Rose City Astronomers will hold their monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Monday, May 15 in the OMSI auditorium in Portland. It will be their annual swap meet and astronomy information fair. The club, along with OMSI and the Vancouver Sidewalk Astronomers, will host public star parties at 8 p.m. Saturday, May 20 at both Rooster Rock State Park and L.L. “Stub” Stewart State Park.

The Island County Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. Monday, May 15 at the Oak Harbor Library.

The Seattle Astronomical Society monthly meeting will be at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 17 in room A102 of the Physics/Astronomy building on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. Guest speaker Woody Sullivan, professor emeritus of astronomy, will talk about the contributions of William and Caroline Herschel to our understanding of comets. Sullivan is working on a biography of William Herschel.

The Tacoma Astronomical Society plans one of its free public nights for 9 p.m. Saturday, May 20. The topic for the indoor presentation will be black holes. If the weather cooperates they’ll break out the telescopes for some observing.

TJO

Theodor Jacobsen ObservatoryThe bi-monthly open house at the UW’s Theodor Jacobsen Observatory is set for 9 p.m. Wednesday, May 17. The topic for the evening’s astronomy talk has not been published. It’s a good idea to make reservations early, as these typically are filled up. Volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society will conduct tours of the observatory dome and, weather permitting, offer a look through its vintage telescope.

Planetarium shows

The Bellevue College Planetarium will run a public show about black holes at 6 p.m. and again at 7 p.m. on Saturday, May 20. The show will include animations of the formation of the early universe, star birth and death, the collision of giant galaxies, and a simulated flight to a super-massive black hole lurking at the center of our own Milky Way Galaxy. It’s free, but reservations are suggested. See the website for registration info and other details.

The Willard Smith Planetarium at the Pacific Science Center offers a variety of shows every day. Their full schedule is posted on our calendar page, where you can also scout out more future astronomy events.

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Busy week ahead on the astro calendar

There’s something for everyone on this week’s astro calendar, with a new scale model solar system opening, two great lectures, a theater/science mashup, and a variety of club events on the docket.

A new scale model of the solar system that you can explore through geocaching opens today, May 1, on Bainbridge Island. Check out our article or podcast from last week to learn more.

Proxima b

You’ve probably heard by now of the discovery of a planet orbiting our nearest stellar neighbor, Proxima Centauri. (If not, check out our article featuring UW professor Rory Barnes discussing the possibility of the habitability of Proxima b.) The UW Astrobiology Program and the NASA Astrobiology Institute will host a panel discussion about the planet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 3 in room 120 of Kane Hall on the university’s campus in Seattle.

The panelists include Guillem Anglada-Escude, lead discoverer of the planet and University of London lecturer; Victoria Meadows, University of Washington astrobiology professor and primary investigator for the Virtual Planetary Laboratory; Barnes; and Olivier Guyon, University of Arizona professor and project scientist for the Subaru Telescope.

It’s free but registration is required; as of this writing there were still some tickets available.

Searching for Martians

Bob Abel talkMars may have been habitable before Earth was, and might be still. So where are the Martians? Olympic College professor Bob Abel will give a talk about the history of Mars and the prospects for past, present, and future life there at 6 p.m. Thursday, May 4 in room 117 of the Engineering Building on the Olympic College campus in Bremerton. It’s free.

Abel gave a talk on the same topic last week at Astronomy on Tap Seattle. Our recap of that event is coming soon.

Astronomy Day at MOF

The Museum of Flight celebrates Space Day during its Free First Thursday at 5 p.m. May 4. Local astronomy clubs will be on hand with information about their activities and they’ll have telescopes for observing if the weather cooperates. A special presentation at 6 p.m. will take a look at the technical challenges of getting Apollo to the Moon, and what that means for present-day space efforts. Tony Gondola, a solar system ambassador and coordinator of the museum’s Challenger Learning Center will be the speaker.

The event runs through 9 p.m.

Mashing up science and theater

Centrifuge2Infinity Box Theatre Project will present Centrifuge 2 at 8 p.m. this Friday and Saturday, May 5 and 6, at Stage One Theater on the North Seattle College campus. Centrifuge pairs science writers and playwrights to craft brand-new one-act plays featuring current science. Seattle Astronomy’s Greg Scheiderer participated in the event last year and will be one of the science writers again this time around. Check out our article and podcast from last year to learn more about Centrifuge and Infinity Box.

Open house at TJO

The Theodor Jacobsen Observatory at the University of Washington will hold one of its bimonthly open houses at 9 p.m. Wednesday, May 3. The topic for the evening’s talk had not been published as of this writing. Volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society will be on hand to offer tours of the observatory and, weather allowing, a look through its vintage telescope.

Club events

The Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 2 in room 175 of Thompson Hall on the University of Puget Sound campus in Tacoma. The topic will be club participation in viewing the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse.

The club will also offer one of its free public nights at 9 p.m. Saturday, May 6 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The indoor session will be a presentation about constellations. They’ll break out the telescopes for observing if the sky is clear.

The Spokane Astronomical Society plans its monthly meeting for 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 5 at the planetarium at Spokane Falls Community College. Club member Nick Monkman will talk about the ABCs of finding objects in the night sky.

The Seattle Astronomical Society plans its monthly free public star parties for 9 p.m. Saturday, May 6 at two locations: Green Lake in Seattle and Paramount Park in Shoreline. Bad weather causes cancellations, so watch the website for updates.

You can always scout out future events on our calendar page.

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Mars events on tap for week of Astronomy Day

There are a couple of Mars-themed events on the docket for Red Planet buffs this week, plus star parties and Astronomy Day celebrations.

AOT April 26Astronomy on Tap Seattle returns to Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 26. Two talks are on the schedule. Bob Abel, a professor of applied physics at Olympic College, will give a lecture titled, “Where are the Martians?” Abel will look at the history and current state of our nearby neighbor, Mars, and examine the possibilities of life in its past, present, and future. University of Victoria doctoral student Benjamin Gerard will discuss his research on “Imaging Worlds Beyond Our Solar System.” He’ll show pictures of other worlds and explain how we use the most powerful telescopes and specially designed optical systems to distinguish an exoplanet from the overwhelming glare of its host star.

Abel, by the way, is scheduled to give a talk on a similar topic at Olympic College on May 4.

Astronomy on Tap Seattle is free, but buy some beer. Bring your own chair to create a front-row experience in the Peddler beer garden!

Red Planet insider

There’s more Mars in store when NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory engineer Terry Himes gives a talk at 2 p.m. Saturday, April 29 at the Museum of Flight. Himes is a veteran of many Mars missions, such as the InSight and Phoenix landers. He’s also worked on Dawn, Deep Impact/Epoxi, and more. Learn what it takes to get there, and back.

Star parties

There are several star parties scheduled for the weekend. The monthly Covington Community Park Star Party is planned for 9 p.m. Friday, April 28 at the park in Covington. The star party is a joint effort of the Seattle Astronomical Society, Boeing Employees Astronomical Society, and Tacoma Astronomical Society. It’s weather dependent, so watch the websites for more information.

The Battle Point Astronomical Association will celebrate Astronomy Day beginning at 3 p.m. Saturday, April 29 at their Edwin Ritchie Observatory in Battle Point Park on Bainbridge Island. Daytime activities include viewing the Sun, a walk through the solar system, and tours of the observatory. Once it gets dark they’ll look at Jupiter and other celestial delights if weather permits.

OMSI and Rose City Astronomers in Portland celebrate Astronomy Day with star parties at two locations: Rooster Rock and Stub Stewart state parks in Oregon. They’ll get going at sunset, weather permitting.

You can always scout out future events on the Seattle Astronomy calendar.

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Lawrence Krause talk, other events this week

An appearance by award-winning theoretical physicist and best-selling author Lawrence Krauss is the highlight of this week’s busy area astronomy events calendar.

Krauss, author of The Physics of Star Trek (Basic Books, 2007) and A Universe From Nothing (Atria Books, 2012), will speak at Town Hall Seattle at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 12. He’ll talk about his new book, The Greatest Story Ever Told—So Far: Why Are We Here? (Atria Books, 2017). The book explores the furthest reaches of space and time and the natural forces that govern our existence. Krauss challenges us to re-envision ourselves and our place within the universe.

Tickets are $5 and are available online.

Yuri’s afternoon

Wednesday is the 56th anniversary of the date cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first human to fly in orbit around the Earth. April 12 has since become known as “Yuri’s Night,” though many celebrations are sprinkled around the month. The Museum of Flight will observe Yuri’s Night on Saturday afternoon, April 15, at two o’clock. Professor Linda Dawson, author of the newly released The Politics and Perils of Space Exploration: Who Will Compete, Who Will Dominate? (Springer Praxis Books, 2017), will discuss her book about the “New Space” race and sign copies afterward.

Dawson, who served as Aerodynamics Officer for the Mission Control Center Ascent and Entry Flight Control Teams during the first space shuttle mission, is a senior lecturer in physical science and statistics at the University of Washington, Tacoma, and serves on a couple of Museum of flight committees.

Club events

The Boeing Employees Astronomical Society will meet at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 13 at the Boeing “Oxbow” recreation center. The program will feature NASA Solar System Ambassador Ron Hobbs, who will discuss the final months of the Cassini mission at Saturn. If you don’t mind a few spoilers, check out our recap of Hobbs’s talk on the subject given to the Seattle Astronomical Society in February. Non-Boeing employees are welcome, but must RSVP. Follow the link above for details.

The Tacoma Astronomical Society plans one of its public nights for 9 p.m. Saturday, April 15 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The all-weather presentation will be about space rocks, asteroids, and comets. If the sky is clear, they’ll bring out the telescopes and see what’s up.

Planetaria

The Bellevue College planetarium will run a show about stars at 6 p.m. and again at 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 15. The shows are free, but reservations are strongly recommended as seating is limited. Visit the college website for reservation info and other details.

The Willard Smith Planetarium at Pacific Science Center offers a variety of shows every day. Their full schedule is on our calendar page. A new show about the skies of ancient China and another, geared to kids, about Chinese astronomy have been created in conjunction with the science center’s recently opened Terracotta Warriors exhibit. We hope to do a feature post about the shows in the coming weeks.

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TJO events return in a busy week

The return of the Theodor Jacobsen Observatory open houses and no less than five astronomy-club events highlight a jam-packed astro calendar for the coming week.

Theodor Jacobsen ObservatoryA welcome sign of spring is the return of the open houses at the Theodor Jacobsen Observatory on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. Astronomy talks and observing through the observatory’s vintage 6-inch Brashear telescope on a Warner & Swasey equatorial mount will happen on the first and third Wednesdays of the month from April through September. The first of the year will be this Wednesday, April 5, beginning at 8 p.m.

Observatory director Dr. Ana Larson will talk about the cause of the phases of the Moon as well as eclipses of the Moon and Sun, with an emphasis on this year’s total eclipse of the Sun to be seen as its shadow sweeps a path across the U.S. on August 21. Future talks will be given by UW undergraduates. Volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society staff the observatory dome and, if weather permits, pop the roof for a little stargazing.

While these events are free reservations are strongly recommended for the talks, which typically fill the small classroom in the observatory. In fact, reservations are already completely booked for the April 19 open house. A schedule for future talk topics will be posted soon on the observatory website.

Club events

The Olympic Astronomical Society plans its monthly meeting for Monday, April 3 at 7:30 p.m. in room Engineering 117 at Olympic College in Bremerton. Topics will include the solar eclipse, black holes, and a movie from the club’s Camp Delaney Star Party.

The Tacoma Astronomical Society will meet at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 4 in room 175 of Thompson Hall on the University of Puget Sound campus in Tacoma. Guest speaker Stephanie Anderson, co-owner of Cloud Break Optics in Ballard, will talk about astrophotography from the city. The society will also hold one of its public nights at 9 p.m. Saturday, April 8 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The indoor presentation will be about space exploration. If the weather cooperates they’ll bring out the telescopes for some observing.

The Spokane Astronomical Society’s monthly meeting is set for 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 7 at the planetarium at Spokane Falls Community College. The topic will be all about telescopes: different types, how they work, and reasons to choose one design over another.

The Battle Point Astronomical Association plans a full evening of events for Saturday, April 8, with their BP Astro Kids program about the lives of stars running at 4 p.m. and again at 5 o’clock. Their planetarium show at 7:30 p.m. will look at when galaxies collide. It all happens at their observatory in Battle Point Park on Bainbridge Island.

Astronomy Night at Shorecrest

Shorecrest High School will host an astronomy night at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 4. Events for all weather are planned with something for the entire family.

Science and beer

We’ll find out if beer and dark matter mix at an OMSI Science Pub on Thursday, April 6 at McMenamins Mission Theater and Pub in Portland. Astrophysicist Alison Crocker from Reed College will highlight the most convincing observations astronomers have made of dark matter. The doors open at 5 p.m. and the program begins at 7 o’clock. There’s a $5 suggested donation.

Take your space medicine

NASA Flight Surgeon David Reyes will give a lecture titled, “Space Medicine: Past, Present, and Future” at 2 p.m. Saturday, April 8 at the Museum of Flight. Reyes will discuss the evolution of space medical capabilities over the years, and how NASA and commercial spaceflight companies might address future medical needs on a human mission to Mars. The talk is free with museum admission.

Planetarium shows galore

In addition to the Battle Point shows noted above, there are several other planetarium programs on the docket for the week. The WSU Planetarium in Pullman has a new show about sky moms that will run at 7 p.m. Friday, April 7, and repeat at 11 a.m. Saturday and 5 p.m. Sunday. The program is about motherhood myths associated with the constellations.

The Pierce College Science Dome is running a show about rockets in which kids can build their own! It runs on Saturdays through May at 12:30 p.m. and again at 2 p.m. Tickets are $6 and are available online.

The Willard Smith Planetarium at Pacific Science Center has a variety of shows daily. Their complete schedule is on our calendar page.

Futures file

You can scout ahead for future events on our calendar page. We’ve recently added a number of items, including:

  • A talk by Planet 9 proposer Konstantin Batygin of Caltech, a UW astronomy colloquium April 20
  • A talk by Dr. George Rieke of the James Webb Space Telescope May 18 at UW
  • Seattle Symphony performances to a screening of the film 2001: A Space Odyssey June 30 and July 1
  • A panel discussion about nearby exoplanet Proxima b May 3 at the UW

Up in the sky

It’s the best time of this year to observe Jupiter, which reaches opposition on Friday. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope offer more observing highlights for the week.

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Welcome, spring, and AoT Seattle this week

It’s a busy week ahead on the area astronomy calendar as four club events, a seasonal observance, and a monthly get-together are on the docket.

AOT Seattle March 24Astronomy on Tap Seattle observes its second birthday this month, and will celebrate with a rare Friday gathering at 7 p.m. March 24 at Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard. The evening’s talks will be a retrospective of the last year and updates of what’s happened in a variety of areas. Topics include gravitational waves, keeping stars weird, exoplanet discoveries galore, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, when a star is not really a star, and more! There will be a trivia contest and cool prizes as always. It’s free, but buy a beer or three.

Club events

GottliebThe Rose City Astronomers plan their monthly meeting for 7:30 p.m. Monday, March 20 at the OMSI auditorium in Portland. Guest speaker Steve Gottlieb has a fascinating story to tell. Gottlieb recently completed observing the entire New General Catalogue of Nebulae and Clusters of Stars (NGC for short.) That project took him more than 35 years to finish—the NGC lists 7,840 deep-sky objects!

The NGC was compiled by astronomer John Dreyer in the late 19th century, but there were various errors on between 15 and 20 percent of the objects. Gottlieb will discuss the NGC/IC Project, a joint amateur-professional effort to re-examine the 100 to 200 year-old source material used by Dreyer.

The Eastside Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 21 at the Lake Hills Library in Bellevue. EAS member Tom Hager will continue his look at Burnham’s Celestial Handbook. He’ll focus on the constellations Canis Major and Canis Minor, and the dim constellation Monoceros (the Unicorn) that lies between them. Emphasis of the talk will be on what we’ve learned in the 40 years since Robert Burnham published this classic astronomy reference collection.

The Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold one of its public nights at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 25 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The indoor, all-weather presentation will be about ancient astronomy. If the sky is clear they’ll break out the telescopes for some observing.

The Island County Astronomical Society plans a star party at dusk Friday, March 24 at Fort Nugent Park in Oak Harbor.

Welcome, Spring!

Join Alice Enevoldsen of Alice’s Astro Info to watch the first sunset of spring from Solstice Park in West Seattle. Gather at the park at 6:45 p.m. Monday, March 20 for Enevoldsen’s 32nd seasonal sunset watch. The official charts put sunset at 7:23 p.m., but Enevoldsen has found it’s typically about 10 minutes earlier at that location.

Wrapping Mars Madness

The fourth and final presentation of Mars Madness will be given at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 25 at the Museum of Flight. Guest speaker Dr. Sanlyn Buxner, an education specialist and research scientist from the Planetary Science Institute in Tucson, Arizona, will give a lecture titled, “Mars 201: Mission Accomplished.” Buxner will highlight the outstanding achievements and magnificent failures of more than 40 years of Mars mission science and engineering.

Planetaria

The Washington State University Planetarium in Pullman will run a show titled, “Other Earths” this weekend. The presentation highlights the ongoing search for planets in the Milky Way. How many planets are there? How many could support life? Is there life out there? How much we know might surprise you. Shows are scheduled for 7 p.m. Friday, March 24, and 5 p.m. Sunday, March 26. Tickets are $5 at the door, cash or check—no credit cards.

The Willard Smith Planetarium at the Pacific Science Center in Seattle offers a variety of shows each day. Their complete schedule is featured on our calendar page.

Futures file

Plan your astronomy fun by keeping an eye on our calendar. Recently added items include:

  • Astronomy night at Shorecrest High School in Shoreline April 4
  • Table Mountain Star Party registration opens April 1
  • Battle Point Astronomical Association’s next planetarium shows April 8
  • Astronomy Day at the Museum of Flight May 4

You can also learn of events from our postings on Facebook and Twitter.

Up in the sky

Saturn slides up close to the Moon in the predawn hours on Monday. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope offer more observing highlights for the week.

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Pi Day, Mars Madness, and more this week

Pi Day, Mars Madness, planetarium shows galore, and astro club events fill a busy calendar this week.

Pi Day

Celebrate Pi Day at 5 p.m. Tuesday, March 14 at the Pierce College Science Dome. This free celebration will include hands-on math and science activities, a pi recitation typing contest, and Chaos and Order: A Mathematical Symphony. Please reserve seats in advance for the symphony, which will run at 5 p.m., 6 p.m., and 7 p.m. in the dome. Reservations are not needed for the other activities.

MOF Mars Madness

Phoenix landerMars Madness continues at the Museum of Flight at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 18. This week’s presentation will feature the museum’s Carla Bitter, former education and public outreach manager of NASA’s Phoenix Mars Lander mission, who will give a family friendly, fast paced Mars 101: Know Your Missions presentation, complete with Red Planet prizes. Mars Madness is happening every Saturday in March, and is free with museum admission.

Club meetings

The Olympic Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Monday, March 13 in room Engineering 117 at Olympic College in Bremerton. A guest speaker will talk about the Moon. Mysteriously, the club website doesn’t list who the speaker will be. Is it a major Moon celebrity?

The Seattle Astronomical Society plans its monthly meeting for 7:30 p.m. on the Ides of March—Wednesday, March 15—in room A102 of the Physics/Astronomy building on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. Guest speaker Dan Dixon, creator of the Universe Sandbox simulation game, will talk about how he and his team of programmers, a planetary scientist, and a climate scientist collaborated to create an app that can model galactic collisions and solar system dynamics.

Planetarium shows

Check out The Secret Lives of Stars, a free show at the Bellevue College Planetarium that will play at 6 p.m. and repeat at 7 p.m. on Saturday, March 18. Reservations are recommended; information about reservations, parking, and location is online.

The Willard Smith Planetarium at the Pacific Science Center offers a variety of programs every day. Check their complete lineup on our calendar page.

Futures file

You can scout out future astronomy events on our calendar. We’ve recently added:

Up in the sky

Jupiter, Spica, and the Moon will form a nice triangle in the evening on Tuesday. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope offer more observing highlights for the week.

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