Category Archives: calendar

Jacobsen Observatory resumes open houses this week

TJO

Theodor Jacobsen Observatory at the UW. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

Spring has sprung, and one of the many wonderful manifestations of that is the resumption of bi-monthly open houses at the University of Washington’s Theodor Jacobsen Observatory. The first of the year will be held beginning at 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 2. Future open houses will be held on the first and third Tuesday of each month through September.

The day of the week is a change. The open houses have been held on Wednesday evenings ever since we can remember.

The open houses typically include a couple of astronomy talks by UW students. This week Aislynn Wallach will talk about The Future of Telescopes and Aleezah Ali will discuss Binary Stars. Unfortunately, reservations for these free events are usually snapped up pretty early, and the April 2 event is already listed as full. The observatory classroom in which the talks are held only holds 45 people. You can check out future topics and make reservations on the TJO website.

Volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society staff the observatory dome on open house evenings and, weather permitting, give visitors a look through the vintage 1892 telescope, which has a 6-inch Brashear objective lens on a Warner & Swasey equatorial mount.

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Destination Moon exhibit taking shape at Museum of Flight

Helmet and gloves

The helmet and gloves used by Buzz Aldrin when he walked on the Moon, from the Destination Moon exhibit in St. Louis. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

With less than a month to go until its opening, the Destination Moon exhibit about the Apollo 11 mission is taking shape at the Museum of Flight. Museum staff announced in a news release this week that the helmet and gloves used by astronaut Buzz Aldrin during his walk on the Moon have been installed in the space. The centerpiece of the exhibit is the Apollo 11 command module Columbia, but it will feature many other artifacts of the historic mission.

I saw the exhibit when it was in St. Louis last summer (story here) and it was great. It opens at the Museum of Flight April 13 and runs through September 2, a stretch of dates that includes the 50th anniversary of the July 20, 1969 “giant leap for mankind.”

There will be some differences in the exhibit from when it was in St. Louis. For example, the Museum of Flight release notes that the helmet and gloves display will include a magnifying glass so that museum visitors can read the to-do list on Aldrin’s glove reminding him of his tasks during the moonwalk. A key item on the list: get a photograph of a boot print on the Moon!

More helmet and gloves

Shelley Sterns-Blackburn, ELY, Inc, and Lisa Young, Conservator at National Air and Space Museum make some final adjustments to spacesuit gloves worn by Buzz Aldrin while on the surface of the Moon. Aldrin’s helmet and visor are in place on the left. Photo Ted Huetter/The Museum of Flight.

Tickets for all dates of the exhibit are now on sale on the Museum of Flight website. Tickets are $10, or $5 for museum members, and must be purchased in addition to museum general admission, which is $25 for adults, $21 for seniors, and $16 for youth. Kids under 4 years of age are admitted free.

In addition, there is a free member preview of the exhibit scheduled for Sunday, April 7, which sounds like an excellent reason to join up today. Several free days are planned during the run of the exhibit, though no details on those have yet been published.

When I saw the exhibit at the St. Louis Science Center I went on a weekday afternoon and there were no lines or crowds; I just walked up and bought a ticket. Weekends might be a different story.

I can’t wait to see it again!

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Calendar: Yuri’s Night, SETI, and club events on the horizon

It was 57 years ago this Thursday that Yuri Gagarin became the first human in space. Celebrate with a dance party this week, and check in on some interesting club meetings, too.

Yuri’s Night

While Yuri’s Night is officially April 12, many organizations celebrate at a more convenient time. The Museum of Flight will be throwing a 21+ dance party beginning at 7 p.m. Saturday, April 14. The evening will feature live music from the band Noise Complaint, a costume contest, food trucks, a cash bar, and a mixed-reality experience. You’ll also get to mingle with a list of “aerospace guest stars, including Chris Lewicki of Planetary Resources; Erik Lindbergh, co-founder of XPRIZE; Scott Schoneman, chief engineer at Spaceflight; So-yeon Yi, the first South Korean and 49th woman to fly in space; and Marilyn Ferguson, a software engineer at Blue Origin.

Tickets to the event are $35, or $30 for museum members. They’re available online.

The museum’s weekly aerospace update on Saturday will feature a special tribute to Gagarin. That will be at 1 p.m.

Jill Tarter in Portland

Jill TarterThe Rose City Astronomers in Portland will have an outstanding guest speaker next week when Jill Tarter of the SETI Institute gives a talk at their monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 16. The meeting will occur at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry in Portland. Tarter has long been involved in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, and will explore what’s coming up in our effort to answer that fundamental question: Are we alone? Tarter’s work is the basis for the Jodie Foster character in the 1997 film Contact.

This is the sort of event Seattle Astronomy would like to be able to cover more often. Won’t you please consider a subscription through Patreon to help defer our costs? Even a dollar a month is a big help!

Club events

Several astronomy clubs have meetings this week:

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Astronomy on Tap and a blue moon this week

It’s a light calendar of astronomy events for Easter week, but you can celebrate Astronomy on Tap Seattle’s third birthday and enjoy our second blue moon of the year!

Happy three to AOT

AOT March 28It’s hard to believe it’s been three years since a group of graduate students in astronomy started up the Astronomy on Tap Seattle lecture series, but this week’s edition will mark the 36th consecutive month that they’ve offered interesting talks, astronomy trivia, fun prizes, and great beer. Head to Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 28 for updates on the astronomy AOT has covered in the last year, and a look at the exciting new science that has come out recently—neutron star mergers, new planets, and more!

It’s free, but buy some beer. Bring your own chair to create premium, front-row seating.

Blue moon

It turns out “once in a blue moon” isn’t all that rare! Saturday’s full moon will already be the second one this year, at least by the definition that a blue moon is the second full moon in a calendar month. We had a blue moon in January, too; see the video below of Seattle Astronomy’s Greg Scheiderer talking on KING-TV’s New Day Northwest about the super blue blood moon.

The next blue moon after this week will be on Halloween in 2020.

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Calendar: Public star parties and club meetings galore this week

There are four area astronomy club meetings and five free public star parties on the docket for the coming week.

SAS welcomes BPAA

Steve Ruhl, president of the Battle Point Astronomical Association, will be the guest speaker at the monthly meeting of the Seattle Astronomical Society at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 21 in the Physics/Astronomy Building on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. Ruhl will talk about the association’s Edwin Ritchie Observatory, John Rudolph Planetarium, and the club’s array of events open to the public. That’s their 27.5-inch telescope in the observatory at left.

Other club events this week include:

Star parties

The Seattle Astronomical Society will host four free public star parties this week. The first is scheduled for 8 p.m. Friday, March 23 at Covington Community Park. The following three are slated for 8 p.m. Saturday, March 24 at Green Lake, Paramount School Park, and the Green River Natural Resources Area in Kent. All are subject to cancellation in cases of poor weather; keep an on on the SAS website for the latest.

The Tacoma Astronomical Society plans one of its public nights for 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 24 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The all-weather program will be about black holes. They’ll break out the telescopes for observing if weather permits.

Planetaria

There’s a new program this week at the WSU Planetarium in Pullman. The show, titled Strange Universe, takes a look at some of the quirky, oddball objects in the cosmos. The program runs at 7 p.m. Friday, March 23 and again at 5 p.m. Sunday, March 25. Admission is $5 at the door, cash or check; they don’t accept credit cards.

Check our calendar page to find links to other local planetaria and their schedules, and to scout out other astro-events in the coming weeks and months.

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Serious fun with astronomy, history, and literature

The University of Washington College of Arts and Sciences is presenting a monthly Serious Fun Lecture series, and the event next week includes Brett Morris, co-founder of Astronomy on Tap Seattle and a Ph.D. candidate in the dual-title Astronomy and Astrobiology Program. Morris will be one of three speakers to tackle the topic “Secrets and Mysteries.”

Brett Morris

Brett Morris

“We hope to evoke your curiosity, with mysteries and secrets across disciplines,” Morris said. “I’m honored to be speaking alongside two distinguished faculty who work in history and literature, and wade into mysteries just as much as astronomers do. I’ll tell the story of one of the most important astronomers you’ve never heard of, and the mystery she uncovered in our Universe—and how we might solve it.”

The other speakers will be Andrew Nestingen, Chair and associate professor in the Scandinavian Studies Department, and Laurie Sears, Walker Endowed Professor in History.

The lecture will be held at 7 p.m. next Wednesday, February 21, in the Brechemin Auditorium, which is on the east end of the School of Music’s main floor in the Music Building on the UW campus in Seattle. The lecture is free but registration is required.

A March lecture in the series will be about dragons, and in April they’ll take on time.

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Calendar: UW colloquium and AOT Seattle this week

A couple of interesting talks and no less than five club meetings fill the astronomy event calendar for this week.

UW Astronomy Colloquium

Juno at Jupiter

Juno at Jupiter. Image: NASA

Come learn about what the Juno mission is accomplishing at Jupiter. Sam Gulkis of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, one of the co-investigators for Juno, will speak at the University of Washington astronomy colloquium at 4 p.m. Thursday, February 15 in the Physics/Astronomy Auditorium on the UW campus in Seattle. Often the colloquia are a little heavy for the non-scientist audience, but this one sounds approachable. Gulkis will discuss how Juno peeks under Jupiter’s clouds using microwaves and other techniques, and he’ll fill us in on some of the mission’s early findings.

Astronomy on Tap Seattle

AOT Feb 2018Astronomy on Tap Seattle has an unusual Friday gathering this month, with two talks, astronomy trivia, and great prizes on the docket for 7 p.m. February 16 at Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard. The topic for the evening will be Cosmic Explorers. Dr. Jen Sobeck, a senior research scientist in the UW Department of Astronomy, will talk about the Harvard Computers—the women who mapped the sky! Dr. Elizabeth Tasker, author of The Planet Factory: Exoplanets and the Search for a Second Earth (Bloomsbury Sigma, 2017) will talk about “Earth 2.0” and the search for a habitable world. (By the way, if you buy the book from that link, Seattle Astronomy gets a small royalty at no cost to you! It helps us do what we do. Thanks!)

AOT is free, but remember to buy beer. Bring a lawn chair to create your own front-row seating!

Cosmic love

The Washington State University Planetarium in Pullman has a special show planned for Valentine’s Day, Wednesday, February 14. “Some Like It Hot” will show at 7 p.m. and again at 8:30. It’s not the movie with Marilyn Monroe, and Tony Curtis; this planetarium show is all about temperature—from the frigid to the muy caliente, the universe has it all.

Admission is $5 cash or check at the door. No credit cards are accepted at the planetarium.

Check our calendar page for a list of links to other planetaria in the area.

Astronomy club meetings

The Island County Astronomical also plans a public star party for 7 p.m. Friday, February 16 at Fort Nugent Park in Oak Harbor.

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