Category Archives: calendar

Calendar: Public star parties and club meetings galore this week

There are four area astronomy club meetings and five free public star parties on the docket for the coming week.

SAS welcomes BPAA

Steve Ruhl, president of the Battle Point Astronomical Association, will be the guest speaker at the monthly meeting of the Seattle Astronomical Society at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 21 in the Physics/Astronomy Building on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. Ruhl will talk about the association’s Edwin Ritchie Observatory, John Rudolph Planetarium, and the club’s array of events open to the public. That’s their 27.5-inch telescope in the observatory at left.

Other club events this week include:

Star parties

The Seattle Astronomical Society will host four free public star parties this week. The first is scheduled for 8 p.m. Friday, March 23 at Covington Community Park. The following three are slated for 8 p.m. Saturday, March 24 at Green Lake, Paramount School Park, and the Green River Natural Resources Area in Kent. All are subject to cancellation in cases of poor weather; keep an on on the SAS website for the latest.

The Tacoma Astronomical Society plans one of its public nights for 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 24 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The all-weather program will be about black holes. They’ll break out the telescopes for observing if weather permits.


There’s a new program this week at the WSU Planetarium in Pullman. The show, titled Strange Universe, takes a look at some of the quirky, oddball objects in the cosmos. The program runs at 7 p.m. Friday, March 23 and again at 5 p.m. Sunday, March 25. Admission is $5 at the door, cash or check; they don’t accept credit cards.

Check our calendar page to find links to other local planetaria and their schedules, and to scout out other astro-events in the coming weeks and months.


Serious fun with astronomy, history, and literature

The University of Washington College of Arts and Sciences is presenting a monthly Serious Fun Lecture series, and the event next week includes Brett Morris, co-founder of Astronomy on Tap Seattle and a Ph.D. candidate in the dual-title Astronomy and Astrobiology Program. Morris will be one of three speakers to tackle the topic “Secrets and Mysteries.”

Brett Morris

Brett Morris

“We hope to evoke your curiosity, with mysteries and secrets across disciplines,” Morris said. “I’m honored to be speaking alongside two distinguished faculty who work in history and literature, and wade into mysteries just as much as astronomers do. I’ll tell the story of one of the most important astronomers you’ve never heard of, and the mystery she uncovered in our Universe—and how we might solve it.”

The other speakers will be Andrew Nestingen, Chair and associate professor in the Scandinavian Studies Department, and Laurie Sears, Walker Endowed Professor in History.

The lecture will be held at 7 p.m. next Wednesday, February 21, in the Brechemin Auditorium, which is on the east end of the School of Music’s main floor in the Music Building on the UW campus in Seattle. The lecture is free but registration is required.

A March lecture in the series will be about dragons, and in April they’ll take on time.


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Calendar: UW colloquium and AOT Seattle this week

A couple of interesting talks and no less than five club meetings fill the astronomy event calendar for this week.

UW Astronomy Colloquium

Juno at Jupiter

Juno at Jupiter. Image: NASA

Come learn about what the Juno mission is accomplishing at Jupiter. Sam Gulkis of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, one of the co-investigators for Juno, will speak at the University of Washington astronomy colloquium at 4 p.m. Thursday, February 15 in the Physics/Astronomy Auditorium on the UW campus in Seattle. Often the colloquia are a little heavy for the non-scientist audience, but this one sounds approachable. Gulkis will discuss how Juno peeks under Jupiter’s clouds using microwaves and other techniques, and he’ll fill us in on some of the mission’s early findings.

Astronomy on Tap Seattle

AOT Feb 2018Astronomy on Tap Seattle has an unusual Friday gathering this month, with two talks, astronomy trivia, and great prizes on the docket for 7 p.m. February 16 at Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard. The topic for the evening will be Cosmic Explorers. Dr. Jen Sobeck, a senior research scientist in the UW Department of Astronomy, will talk about the Harvard Computers—the women who mapped the sky! Dr. Elizabeth Tasker, author of The Planet Factory: Exoplanets and the Search for a Second Earth (Bloomsbury Sigma, 2017) will talk about “Earth 2.0” and the search for a habitable world. (By the way, if you buy the book from that link, Seattle Astronomy gets a small royalty at no cost to you! It helps us do what we do. Thanks!)

AOT is free, but remember to buy beer. Bring a lawn chair to create your own front-row seating!

Cosmic love

The Washington State University Planetarium in Pullman has a special show planned for Valentine’s Day, Wednesday, February 14. “Some Like It Hot” will show at 7 p.m. and again at 8:30. It’s not the movie with Marilyn Monroe, and Tony Curtis; this planetarium show is all about temperature—from the frigid to the muy caliente, the universe has it all.

Admission is $5 cash or check at the door. No credit cards are accepted at the planetarium.

Check our calendar page for a list of links to other planetaria in the area.

Astronomy club meetings

The Island County Astronomical also plans a public star party for 7 p.m. Friday, February 16 at Fort Nugent Park in Oak Harbor.


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Calendar: Week of Feb. 5, 2018

There are a couple of club meetings and public events on the calendar for the coming week.

WSU Planetarium

There’s a new show this weekend at the Washington State University Planetarium in Pullman. The program, titled “HST’s Greatest Hits,” highlights the Hubble Space Telescope’s legacy: the deep fields, the stellar nurseries, the black holes, the supernovae. Taken as a whole, HST has opened new vistas of human thought and redefined our place in the cosmos.

The program will run at 7 p.m. Friday, February 9, and repeat at 5 p.m. Sunday, February 11. Admission at the door is $5, cash or check; no credit cards are accepted. Kids 6 and under are free.

Club events

The Battle Point Astronomical Association on Bainbridge Island has a full afternoon and evening of events set for this Saturday, February 10. The BPAstroKids program will have a Valentine’s special at 4 p.m. and again at 5 p.m. Participants will be able to make pop-up LED Valentine’s cards and build lava lamps. Then at 7:30 p.m. the club’s planetarium show will tell “Twisted Tales of Love and Loss,” as astronomer Dave Fong will present humorous takes on ancient Greek star lore.

There’s a $2 donation suggested for admisison. There will be stargazing, too, weather permititng.

The Tacoma Astronomical Society plans one of its public nights for 7:30 p.m. Saturday, February 10 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The indoor presentation will be about binocular astronomy. There will be stargazing if the clouds part.

Club meetings


Calendar: SAS banquet and Astronomy on Tap Seattle this week

The annual Seattle Astronomical Society banquet and Astronomy on Tap Seattle are the highlight events for the coming week. The Museum of Flight kicks off Astronaut Remembrance Week, and regional planetarium shows cap the calendar.

SAS Banquet

Robert Reeves

Robert Reeves

The Seattle Astronomical Society banquet always draws an excellent guest speaker, and this year is no exception: renowned photographer Robert Reeves will keynote the annual banquet, and talk in particular about observing and imaging the Moon. The banquet gets under way at 4 p.m. Sunday, January 28 at the Swedish Club on Dexter Avenue North in Seattle. Reservations are $65 for the general public, $55 for SAS members. Don’t wait; there were only 18 spots left as of this writing. Reservations are available online.

Reeves will do a special master class on lunar photography for the SAS Astrophotography Special Interest Group. The class is open to the public and will be held at 5:30 p.m. Saturday, January 27 in the Red Barn Classroom at the Museum of Flight.

Astronomy on Tap Seattle

AOT Seattle January 2018The topic will be exploring alien moons when Astronomy on Tap Seattle holds its first event of the new year at 7 p.m. Wednesday, January 24 in the beer garden at Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard. Second-year UW graduate student in astronomy and astrobiology Tyler Gordon will speak about his research on the search for exoplanetary satellites using current and future telescopes. UW Ph.D. student in oceanography Max Showalter will discuss looking for life when the trail goes cold, an update on his work using movement as a sign of life in icy places.

Showalter did a talk at Town Hall Seattle almost two years ago. Check our recap of that talk and learn how SHAMU is helping hunt for ET.

Planetarium shows

The Washington State University Planetarium in Pullman has a new show this week titled, “Millions of Miles to Mars.” The show explores the whats, hows, and whens of Mars visits. Showtimes are 7 p.m. Friday, Jan 26, and 5 p.m. Sunday, Jan 28. Tickets at the door are $5 cash or check; they don’t accept credit cards. Kids under six get in free.

The Willard Smith Planetarium at the Pacific Science Center has a variety of shows for all ages every day. Check their website for the complete calendar.

Astronaut remembrance

America’s three great spacefaring tragedies all occurred at this time of year. To honor the sacrifices of the fallen astronauts, the Museum of Flight holds an annual astronaut remembrance week. The event runs from Friday, January 26 through Sunday, February 4 and features displays and exhibits about the fallen astronauts and their accomplishments. Solar System Ambassador Ron Hobbs will give a presentation about the tragic missions, and about the risks and successes of space travel, at 2 p.m. Saturday, January 27. It’s free with museum admission.

Future file

A total eclipse of the Moon will be visible in the early morning hours of Wednesday, January 31. The event begins just after 3 a.m. PDT, the partial eclipse starts around 3:45, and it will be total from just before 5 a.m. until a little after 6:00. All you really need to do is go outside and look up, but if you want to watch with others, the Seattle Astronomical Society plans a group viewing event at Solstice Park in West Seattle.

You can always scout out future events on our calendar.


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Calendar: Meet with Ladies Who Launch this week

Ladies who launch gather this week at the Museum of Flight, and there’s a lot of local club activity on the calendar.

Ladies who Launch

Ladies who launchElsbeth Magilton, executive director of the Space, Cyber, and Telecommunications law programs at the University of Nebraska College of Law, will speak at a special Ladies Who Launch event at 6 p.m. Tuesday, January 9 at the Museum of Flight in Seattle. Magilton’s areas of specialty include commercial space law and policy, cybersecurity and cybercrime, and national security. She will focus on the need for more women in leadership positions in aerospace and the technology sector, and positive, concrete steps we can take to advance our careers accordingly.

Ladies Who Launch is a specialized networking group for professional women with ten or more years of experience and a passion for flight, who are actively seeking to advance their careers in any industry and hold, or desire to obtain, leadership roles. Tickets to the event are $35 and are available online.

Battle Point

The Battle Point Astronomical Association’s monthly public events are coming up Saturday, January 13. Family date night starts at 4 p.m. when BP Astro Kids look at how things spin and what that means. The presentation repeats again at 5 p.m. Following at 7:30, the monthly planetarium show looks at the similarities between telescopes and dragonflies, and examines the work of a new class of ‘scopes. There will be stargazing, too, weather permitting.

Astronomy club meetings

Olympic Astronomical Society, Monday, January 8, 7:30 p.m.
Heart of the Valley Astronomers, Tuesday, January 9, 7 p.m.
Boeing Employees Astronomical Society, Friday, January 12, 7 p.m. Agenda
Everett Astronomical Society, Saturday, January 13, 3 p.m.

Futures file

Rose City Astronomers meet next Monday, January 15, at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry in Portland. The guest speaker will be Ethan Siegel, author of Treknology: The Science of Star Trek from Tricorders to Warp Drive (Voyaguer Press, 2017). Check out our podcast and article with Siegel about the book. You can always scout future Northwest astronomy events on our calendar.


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Astro events for the new year

Happy New Year from Seattle Astronomy! Help ring in 2018 with a number of events this week.

The Quadrantid meteor shower peaks on Wednesday and Thursday this week. Unfortunately, viewing will be difficult this year because the Moon was full on New Year’s Day and its light will wash out many of the meteors. This article from EarthSky has info about viewing this meteor shower, and our stargazing sites page has some ideas for places to go to see them in the Northwest.

Club events

Tacoma Astronomical SocietyThe Tacoma Astronomical Society will get right into it with its monthly meeting tonight, Tuesday, January 2, at 7:30 p.m. in room 175 of Thompson Hall at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma. Guest speaker Jim Sykes of the Olympic Astronomical Society will discuss Mira variables and his naked-eye observations of these objects.

The Tacoma club also plans one of its public nights beginning at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, January 6 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The all-weather presentation will be about 110 celestial objects; we’re guessing that means a look at the Messier catalog. There will be stargazing if weather permits.

The Spokane Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. Friday, January 5 at Riverview Retirement Center. It will be the group’s holiday potluck.

UW Astronomy colloquium

The first University of Washington astronomy colloquium of fall quarter is set for 4 p.m. Thursday, January 4 in the Physics/Astronomy auditorium on the Seattle campus. UW postdoc Vid Iršič will discuss the intergalactic medium and the role it plays in constraining warm dark matter and fuzzy dark matter models.

Scout future events on our Northwest Astronomy Events calendar.