Category Archives: calendar

Calendar: Week of Feb. 5, 2018

There are a couple of club meetings and public events on the calendar for the coming week.

WSU Planetarium

There’s a new show this weekend at the Washington State University Planetarium in Pullman. The program, titled “HST’s Greatest Hits,” highlights the Hubble Space Telescope’s legacy: the deep fields, the stellar nurseries, the black holes, the supernovae. Taken as a whole, HST has opened new vistas of human thought and redefined our place in the cosmos.

The program will run at 7 p.m. Friday, February 9, and repeat at 5 p.m. Sunday, February 11. Admission at the door is $5, cash or check; no credit cards are accepted. Kids 6 and under are free.

Club events

The Battle Point Astronomical Association on Bainbridge Island has a full afternoon and evening of events set for this Saturday, February 10. The BPAstroKids program will have a Valentine’s special at 4 p.m. and again at 5 p.m. Participants will be able to make pop-up LED Valentine’s cards and build lava lamps. Then at 7:30 p.m. the club’s planetarium show will tell “Twisted Tales of Love and Loss,” as astronomer Dave Fong will present humorous takes on ancient Greek star lore.

There’s a $2 donation suggested for admisison. There will be stargazing, too, weather permititng.

The Tacoma Astronomical Society plans one of its public nights for 7:30 p.m. Saturday, February 10 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The indoor presentation will be about binocular astronomy. There will be stargazing if the clouds part.

Club meetings

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Calendar: SAS banquet and Astronomy on Tap Seattle this week

The annual Seattle Astronomical Society banquet and Astronomy on Tap Seattle are the highlight events for the coming week. The Museum of Flight kicks off Astronaut Remembrance Week, and regional planetarium shows cap the calendar.

SAS Banquet

Robert Reeves

Robert Reeves

The Seattle Astronomical Society banquet always draws an excellent guest speaker, and this year is no exception: renowned photographer Robert Reeves will keynote the annual banquet, and talk in particular about observing and imaging the Moon. The banquet gets under way at 4 p.m. Sunday, January 28 at the Swedish Club on Dexter Avenue North in Seattle. Reservations are $65 for the general public, $55 for SAS members. Don’t wait; there were only 18 spots left as of this writing. Reservations are available online.

Reeves will do a special master class on lunar photography for the SAS Astrophotography Special Interest Group. The class is open to the public and will be held at 5:30 p.m. Saturday, January 27 in the Red Barn Classroom at the Museum of Flight.

Astronomy on Tap Seattle

AOT Seattle January 2018The topic will be exploring alien moons when Astronomy on Tap Seattle holds its first event of the new year at 7 p.m. Wednesday, January 24 in the beer garden at Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard. Second-year UW graduate student in astronomy and astrobiology Tyler Gordon will speak about his research on the search for exoplanetary satellites using current and future telescopes. UW Ph.D. student in oceanography Max Showalter will discuss looking for life when the trail goes cold, an update on his work using movement as a sign of life in icy places.

Showalter did a talk at Town Hall Seattle almost two years ago. Check our recap of that talk and learn how SHAMU is helping hunt for ET.

Planetarium shows

The Washington State University Planetarium in Pullman has a new show this week titled, “Millions of Miles to Mars.” The show explores the whats, hows, and whens of Mars visits. Showtimes are 7 p.m. Friday, Jan 26, and 5 p.m. Sunday, Jan 28. Tickets at the door are $5 cash or check; they don’t accept credit cards. Kids under six get in free.

The Willard Smith Planetarium at the Pacific Science Center has a variety of shows for all ages every day. Check their website for the complete calendar.

Astronaut remembrance

America’s three great spacefaring tragedies all occurred at this time of year. To honor the sacrifices of the fallen astronauts, the Museum of Flight holds an annual astronaut remembrance week. The event runs from Friday, January 26 through Sunday, February 4 and features displays and exhibits about the fallen astronauts and their accomplishments. Solar System Ambassador Ron Hobbs will give a presentation about the tragic missions, and about the risks and successes of space travel, at 2 p.m. Saturday, January 27. It’s free with museum admission.

Future file

A total eclipse of the Moon will be visible in the early morning hours of Wednesday, January 31. The event begins just after 3 a.m. PDT, the partial eclipse starts around 3:45, and it will be total from just before 5 a.m. until a little after 6:00. All you really need to do is go outside and look up, but if you want to watch with others, the Seattle Astronomical Society plans a group viewing event at Solstice Park in West Seattle.

You can always scout out future events on our calendar.

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Calendar: Meet with Ladies Who Launch this week

Ladies who launch gather this week at the Museum of Flight, and there’s a lot of local club activity on the calendar.

Ladies who Launch

Ladies who launchElsbeth Magilton, executive director of the Space, Cyber, and Telecommunications law programs at the University of Nebraska College of Law, will speak at a special Ladies Who Launch event at 6 p.m. Tuesday, January 9 at the Museum of Flight in Seattle. Magilton’s areas of specialty include commercial space law and policy, cybersecurity and cybercrime, and national security. She will focus on the need for more women in leadership positions in aerospace and the technology sector, and positive, concrete steps we can take to advance our careers accordingly.

Ladies Who Launch is a specialized networking group for professional women with ten or more years of experience and a passion for flight, who are actively seeking to advance their careers in any industry and hold, or desire to obtain, leadership roles. Tickets to the event are $35 and are available online.

Battle Point

The Battle Point Astronomical Association’s monthly public events are coming up Saturday, January 13. Family date night starts at 4 p.m. when BP Astro Kids look at how things spin and what that means. The presentation repeats again at 5 p.m. Following at 7:30, the monthly planetarium show looks at the similarities between telescopes and dragonflies, and examines the work of a new class of ‘scopes. There will be stargazing, too, weather permitting.

Astronomy club meetings

Olympic Astronomical Society, Monday, January 8, 7:30 p.m.
Heart of the Valley Astronomers, Tuesday, January 9, 7 p.m.
Boeing Employees Astronomical Society, Friday, January 12, 7 p.m. Agenda
Everett Astronomical Society, Saturday, January 13, 3 p.m.

Futures file

Rose City Astronomers meet next Monday, January 15, at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry in Portland. The guest speaker will be Ethan Siegel, author of Treknology: The Science of Star Trek from Tricorders to Warp Drive (Voyaguer Press, 2017). Check out our podcast and article with Siegel about the book. You can always scout future Northwest astronomy events on our calendar.

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Astro events for the new year

Happy New Year from Seattle Astronomy! Help ring in 2018 with a number of events this week.

The Quadrantid meteor shower peaks on Wednesday and Thursday this week. Unfortunately, viewing will be difficult this year because the Moon was full on New Year’s Day and its light will wash out many of the meteors. This article from EarthSky has info about viewing this meteor shower, and our stargazing sites page has some ideas for places to go to see them in the Northwest.

Club events

Tacoma Astronomical SocietyThe Tacoma Astronomical Society will get right into it with its monthly meeting tonight, Tuesday, January 2, at 7:30 p.m. in room 175 of Thompson Hall at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma. Guest speaker Jim Sykes of the Olympic Astronomical Society will discuss Mira variables and his naked-eye observations of these objects.

The Tacoma club also plans one of its public nights beginning at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, January 6 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The all-weather presentation will be about 110 celestial objects; we’re guessing that means a look at the Messier catalog. There will be stargazing if weather permits.

The Spokane Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. Friday, January 5 at Riverview Retirement Center. It will be the group’s holiday potluck.

UW Astronomy colloquium

The first University of Washington astronomy colloquium of fall quarter is set for 4 p.m. Thursday, January 4 in the Physics/Astronomy auditorium on the Seattle campus. UW postdoc Vid Iršič will discuss the intergalactic medium and the role it plays in constraining warm dark matter and fuzzy dark matter models.

Scout future events on our Northwest Astronomy Events calendar.

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Calendar: club events open December

As we flip the calendar to December, there are a couple of good headline events, four astronomy club meetings, and several educational events to look forward to.

Astronaut and mountaineer Scott Parazinski is the only person ever to have both flown in space and stood on the top of Mount Everest. He’ll be at the Museum of Flight at 2 p.m. on Saturday, December 9 to talk about his experiences and his new book, The Sky Below: A True Story of Summits, Space, and Speed (Little A, 2017). Parazinski will sign copies of the book after his talk, which is free with museum admission.

If you can’t make it Saturday, you can pick up the book by clicking the link above or the book cover at left; Seattle Astronomy gets a small royalty at no cost to you when you purchase this way, and it helps support our operations. Thanks so much!

Life in Space

The Pacific Science Center’s Science in the City lecture series continues at 7 p.m. Wednesday, December 6 with a program called Life in Space. Three University of Washington astrobiologists will discuss their research—including the search for planets around other stars, characterizing how stars influence the habitability of those planets, and techniques to mix computer modeling with data analysis to determine the characteristics of potentially habitable worlds. Two of the three presenters will be familiar to Seattle Astronomy readers. Brett Morris is a PhD candidate of astronomy and astrobiology at the University of Washington and is a co-founder and co-host of the popular Astronomy on Tap Seattle events. Dr. Erika Harnett is a research associate professor and was featured on the blog and podcast this year. The “new guy” is Marshall “Moosh” Styczinski, a grad student who does research using magnetic fields to peel back the icy crust of Jupiter’s moons, looking for places that life may be found.

After viewing the documentary The Search for Life in Space, the trio will answer questions about their research and other topics addressed in the film.

Tickets to Life in Space are $5, free for Pacific Science Center members.

Astronomy club activity

Four clubs have their monthly meetings this week:

In addition, two clubs have public outreach events on Saturday. The BP Astro Kids on Bainbridge Island will make LED holiday cards during sessions at 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. at the Ritchie Observatory on Bainbridge Island. Following at 7:30 p.m. the Battle Point Astronomical Association monthly planetarium show will focus on how neutron stars make gold, and how we can tell they’re doing it. The Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold one of its public nights at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, December 9 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The indoor presentation will be a viewing of the movie The Christmas Star. At both the Battle Point and Tacoma events there will be stargazing if the weather permits.

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Calendar: Watch and hear a lecture from Adler

There’s a full Moon on Saturday and Daylight Saving Time ends on Sunday. Maybe that’s why the astronomy calendar is a little sparse this week!

Are we alone in the universe?

Thousands of exoplanets have been discovered over the past two decades. Dr. Lisa Kaltenegger, Director of the Carl Sagan Institute at Cornell University and an associate professor in Cornell’s astronomy department, will discuss these discoveries during a lecture at 5:30 p.m. Friday, November 3 at Adler Planetarium in Chicago. You don’t have to be in the Windy City to attend; the lecture is part of the bi-annual Kavli Fulldome Lecture Series and will be live streamed to the Pacific Science Center’s Willard Smith Planetarium! It’s part of the center’s on-going Science in the City lecture series. Kaltenegger will explore how we can determine which exoplanets might be suitable for life and cover techniques and missions that could detect life on these faraway worlds.

Tickets are $5, and free to science center members. Space is limited, so advance tickets are recommended.

Club meetings

The Spokane Astronomical Society will meet at 7:30 p.m. Friday, November 3 at the planetarium at Spokane Falls Community College. The guest speaker had not been published as of this writing.

The Seattle Astronomical Society will offer one of its new members orientation sessions at 2 p.m. Sunday, November 5 at the Theodor Jacobsen Observatory on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. While the title calls out “new members,” prospective members are welcome as well. It’s a good time to find out what the society has to offer—and sign up!

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Calendar: spooky action

Astronomy on Tap Seattle returns for its October event this week, and local planetaria get into the Halloween spirit.

Hitchhiker’s guide to the galaxies

AOT Oct 25Astronomy on Tap Seattle will be all about galaxies when its monthly meeting convenes at 7 p.m. Wednesday, October 25 at Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard. This month’s speakers will be Dr. Jennifer Sobeck, who will discuss her research on the evolution of our galaxy in her talk “A Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy: Bumming Around the Milky Way,” and Grace Telford, whose talk “A Whirlwind Tour of Galaxies: the Tiny, the Gigantic, and Everything in Between” will zoom out and take a census of other galaxies.

Astronomy on Tap Seattle is organized by graduate students in astronomy at the University of Washington, and features informative talks, astronomy-themed trivia contests, excellent prizes, and beer. Bring your own chair to create front-row seating.

Star parties this week

There are several free public star parties on the schedule for this week.

The monthly Covington Community Park star party is set for 8 p.m. Friday, October 27 at the park on 240th in Covington. The event is a joint effort of the Seattle, Boeing Employees, and Tacoma astronomical societies. The Seattle Astronomical Society will hold star parties at 7 p.m. Saturday, October 28 at two locations: Green Lake in Seattle and Paramount Park in Shoreline. These events can be cancelled in case of inclement weather, so watch the website or social media of the Seattle Astronomical Society.

The Tacoma Astronomical Society plans one of its public nights for 7:30 p.m. Saturday, October 28 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The indoor program is a Halloween special. Stargazing will happen if the skies are clear.

Spooky action in planetaria

Area planetarium operators get into the Halloween spirit with holiday-themed shows this weekend. The Washington State University planetarium in Pullman will offer a program titled Cosmic Spooks, featuring creepy illusions in the sky, disturbing constellation mythology, and a dose of real danger. Shows are at 7 p.m. Friday, October 27 and at 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday, October 29. Tickets at the door are $5, cash or check; no credit cards.

It’s the last weekend for the Haunted Night Sky show at the Pierce College Science Dome. The tour to spooky places in the universe is geared toward kids ages 3–12. Showtimes are 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. on Saturday, October 28. Adults get in for free but kids have to pay $6. Tickets are available in advance online.

Scout for future events on the Seattle Astronomy calendar.

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