Category Archives: lectures

Mars is here!

It’s been a big year for Mars. The InSight lander is on the way to the Red Planet, scheduled to land November 26 on a mission to take the vital signs of Mars. There’s a big dust storm on Mars just as it reaches opposition this week, its closest approach to Earth since 2003. Oh, and organics have been found on Mars.

We may have buried the lede on that one.

Mars

July 18 image of Mars by the Hubble Space Telescope. (Image credit NASA, ESA, and STScI)

Dave Cuomo and Keith Krumm from the Pacific Science Center were guest speakers at the July meeting of the Seattle Astronomical Society, and discussed all things Mars.

The discovery of organics on Mars is also evidence that science is not necessarily fast. The work came out of a hole the Curiosity rover drilled in a Mars rock way back in 2015. The papers outlining the discovery just came out earlier this year.

“What it found in a rock that is about three-and-a-half billion years old was organic molecules,” Cuomo said. The substance found was kerogen, which Cuomo called, “a gooey precursor to petroleum.”

Cuomo repeatedly stressed that this does not, not, not mean that there is or ever was life on Mars.

“What we have found is evidence that the building blocks for life on Mars certainly did exist three-and-a-half billion years ago,” he said. “This was the first time that we found clear evidence that this was there.”

Cuomo noted that we know a good bit about the history of the surface of Mars.

“Mars certainly was a warmer and a wetter environment that could have supported life, that life could have evolved on,” he said. “What we don’t know—and this is what InSight is going to help us find out—is how long Mars was more Earth-like.” The longer that warm, wet environment lasted, the greater the potential that life could have arisen.

InSight

Krumm noted that InSight is something of an interplanetary RN.

“It’s going to be taking Mars’ vital signs,” he said. It will use a seismometer to take Mars’s pulse, a heat flow probe to measure its temperature, and the Rotation and Interior Structure Experiment, RISE, will check its reflexes, precisely tracking the location of the lander to determine just how much Mars’ north pole wobbles as it orbits the Sun. Cuomo said a big part of the mission’s purpose is to find out if Mars has a molten core today.

“It has volcanoes, so we know at some point in the past it had a molten interior,” he said. “It had a magnetosphere—the remnants of it are frozen in the rocks—but it does not have an active magnetosphere.”

InSight will help us figure out of the core solidified, or if there’s some other reason for the loss of the magnetosphere. Krumm and Cuomo showed this video about the InSight mission.

The Pacific Science Center plans an event for watching the InSight landing on November 26. Watch this space for details!

Dust storm

The rover Opportunity is powered by solar panels, and the dust storm on Mars has blocked the Sun to an extent that Opportunity has shut down. NASA hasn’t heard from Opportunity since June 10. It’s programmed to switch back on every so often, and shut right back down if it doesn’t find power. Cuomo said that can only go on for so long.

“It’s possible it won’t wake up,” he said. If that happened, it would be a sad end to a tremendous run. Opportunity and its twin, Spirit, landed on Mars in 2004 on missions expected to last 90 days. The last contact with Spirit, stuck in the sand, was in March 2010, while Opportunity, up until last month, at least, has been running for more than 14 years.

Opposition

Mars reached opposition to Earth on the evening of July 26 in Pacific Daylight Time, and will be at its closest approach to Earth for the year on Tuesday, July 31. Those dates are different because of the geometry of the elliptical orbits of the two planets. In any case, we’re closer to Mars than at any time since the great apparition of 2003, which is good news for amateur astronomers. The bad news is that the dust storm could foil our attempts to image and observe surface features of Mars. There was word this week, however, that the storm is fading. Bright red Mars will be a good observing target for the rest of the summer and into early fall.

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LSST to the rescue

We hope the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), under construction in Chile on a timeline that would have it begin science work in 2022, works. There are a bunch of astronomers banking on it to make their lives a lot easier. A group of them—the LSST Solar System Science Collaboration—met earlier this month in Seattle, and four of them gave talks at a special edition of Astronomy on Tap Seattle at Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard.

David Trilling of Northern Arizona University noted that the LSST will have an 8.4-meter mirror and a camera the size of a small car.

“In terms of telescopes, this is a really, really, really big machine,” he understated. That car-sized camera will boast 3.2 billion pixels.

“You’d need 1,500 HDTV screens to look at a single LSST image,” Trilling said. LSST will scan the entire night sky every three to four nights for ten years.

“That’s about ten terabytes of data every night, which is a huge computational challenge,” he noted.

It’s an asteroid. It’s a comet. It’s complicated…

Michael Mommert of Lowell Observatory studies asteroids and comets. He said that sometimes it’s difficult to tell one from another. An asteroid can look like a comet if the asteroid is “active.” This could be because it collided with something else, or it is spinning rapidly, or it was warmed by its proximity to the Sun.

“If we can understand those active asteroids we can better understand the average asteroid,” Mommert said. “We can learn a lot about the mechanisms that are going on in asteroids from those active asteroids.”

Similarly comets can go dormant, with no tail, and look more like asteroids. As they often share similar properties, Mommert said comets and asteroids are on something of a continuum rather than being two distinct types of objects.

In his research Mommert is tracking about 20 active asteroids and 50 dormant comets. He figures he spends 30 nights per year using a telescope. He’ll be able to cut down that time tremendously with LSST; he’ll be able to find his targets and pull data collected by the telescope.

“LSST will improve our understanding of small body populations,” Mommert said. “Asteroids, comets, active asteroids, everything that is out there.”

Tales from the Outer Solar System

Kat Volk of the University of Arizona focuses her research on objects in the outer solar system. Pluto, Eris, and other far-out objects have been discovered by comparing photos of an area of sky and looking for something that moved. In fact, Pluto was the first object discovered in this way.

There are about 2,000 known objects in the Kuiper Belt. That’s about how many asteroids we knew of a century ago.

“Kuiper Belt science is a hundred years behind Asteroid Belt science because these things are just so much more difficult to find,” Volk said, because they’re far away, faint, and move slowly. “We had to wait until we had digital cameras and computers to process those images.”

Volk said we probably have discovered all of the 10-kilometer asteroids and most of the 1-kilometer ones. They’re easier to spot because they’re brighter, and there’s money for the hunt because of the potential threat asteroids pose to Earth.

“For comparison, the smallest ever observed Kuiper Belt object is 30 kilometers across, very roughly,” Volk said, adding that we only found that one because the Hubble Space Telescope was used to look for another target for the New Horizons mission after it passed Pluto.

“We’re pretty incomplete in terms of our object inventory in the outer solar system,” Volk said. She said LSST will change that.

“They expect 40,000 new Kuiper Belt ojects,” Volk said. “It’s going to be an entirely new era for the Kuiper Belt with a huge playground of new objects to look at.”

“I am realy excited to see what we’re going to find with LSST, and it’s going to completely revamp our idea of the outer solar system.”

A Crash Course in Asteroid Defense

Andy Rivkin of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory said that even a 20-meter asteroid packs a wallop when it smashes into Earth. That was roughly the size of the Chelyabinsk meteor in 2013.

Doing the math tells us that there should be about 10 million objects of that size zipping around the solar system, but so far we’ve found only around 10 thousand of them. Back in 2005 Congress told NASA to find 90 percent of objects 140 meters or larger.

“LSST is going to be a critical piece in reaching this goal,” Rivkin said, “and we expect that by 2034 about 86 percent of hazardous asteroids will be found.”

So, what do we do when we spot one headed our way? Rivkin said that for really small ones, like Chelyabinsk, and really large ones, the best idea might be duck and cover. There’s not much to be done about something very large, and small ones don’t pose much of a threat. For those in between, a few options are viable. For one, we could try to deflect the asteroid with a nuclear bomb.

“A lot of people are uncomfortable with nuclear explosions in space, for good reason, and so there’s been a lot of interest in having something else that could work,” Rivkin said.

That something else is a kinetic impactor, which is a fancy way of saying we’ll just smash something into the asteroid to change its speed, and therefore its orbit. It’s a fine idea in theory, but we have no idea if it would actually work. Rivkin is involved in a project that will give it a try.

It’s called DART, which is for Double Asteroid Redirection Test. DART is on schedule to launch for the asteroid Didymos in June of 2021, and then crash into its satellite, nicknamed “Didymoon,” in October 2022. Astronomers will watch through ground-based telescopes and see what happens. Rivkin called it a dress rehearsal for the day we might have to do something about an incoming asteroid.

“A dress rehearsal for, needless to say, a performance we hope never to actually stage,” he said, “demonstrating that we could do this, allowing us to pin these computer simulations to something real, allowing us to better understand asteroidal properties, and giving us a lot of science as an ancillary benefit.”

Astronomy on Tap Seattle is organized by graduate students in astronomy at the University of Washington.

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A cosmic perspective with Jill Tarter of SETI

Jill Tarter thinks that Craig Venter and Daniel Cohen may not have been bold enough when they declared in 2004 that the 21st Century would be the century of biology.

Jill Tarter

The SETI Institute’s Jill Tarter spoke recently at the Rose City Astronomers in Portland, Oregon. (Photo: Greg Scheiderer)

“I think the 21st Century is going to be the century of biology on Earth—and beyond,” Tarter declared during a talk at last month’s meeting of the Rose City Astronomers in Portland, Oregon. Tarter, the Bernard M. Oliver Chair for SETI at the SETI Institute and former director of the Center for SETI Research, thinks there are many ways we might find extraterrestrial intelligence. We might discover it through biomarkers or even artifacts in our own solar system. We could assay the atmospheres of exoplanets looking for biosignatures. We could spot alien “work product” such as structures or signs of engineering. We might even export it, traveling to the Moon, Mars, or even other star systems.

“I think life beyond Earth is a good bet in this 21st Century,” Tarter said, “and when you begin to think about that kind of thing, you really have to reorient your point of view, your perspective. You have to start talking about here and now in a different way, a much bigger point of view, a cosmic perspective.”

Tarter feels that our perspective has changed much since the advent of the space age. Photographs like the Apollo 8 Earthrise or “selfies” by Voyager and Cassini have helped make that happen. We’ve also looked far into the past in viewing distant galaxies.

In the time we’ve been involved in SETI, Tarter says there have been two gamechangers: extremeophiles and exoplanets.

Earthrise

Photos from Space, such as Earthrise by astronaut Willam Anders from Apollo 8, have changed our global perspective. (Photo: NASA)

“Extremeophiles are life as we did not know it until a just few decades ago,” she said, “thriving in places that we once thought completely hostile to life, and they are now illuminating the amazing possibilities for life on our own planet by suggesting more potentially habitable real estate within our solar system and out into the cosmos.”

Similarly, this discovery of thousands of exoplanets has given us more places to look for life.

“Today we know that there are more planets than stars in the Milky Way, and that’s a fundamental change in our perspective,” Tarter said. “When I was a student we knew of nine planets—then lost one!—and didn’t know whether planets would be plentiful around other stars.”

“There is more potentially habitable real estate out there than we ever imagined,” she added, stressing the potential. “We have no idea whether any of it is, in fact, inhabited, but that’s what this century is going to tell us.”

Tarter noted that a big assumption of SETI is that since our technology is visible from a distance, that alien technology might be as well. So we’re looking for something engineered, not a natural occurrence of astrophysics.

“Whether or not SETI succeeds with its optical, infrared, radio searches for signals is going to depend on the longevity of technologies,” Tarter explained, “because unless technologies, on average, last for a long time, there are never going to be two technologies close enough in space to detect one another and coeval in time—lined up at the same time in this ten billion year history of the Milky Way galaxy.”

Tarter said that, in 50 years of SETI, we’ve searched an amount of the cosmos that compares to a 12-ounce glass of water out of the total of Earth’s oceans, so it’s not so surprising that we haven’t yet caught a fish. She adds we’ve been limited by our technology.

“We are beginning to build tools that are commensurate with the vast size of this search, and we understand that the ocean is vast and we are still very, very motivated to go and find what might be out there,” Tarter said. The Allen Telescope Array is a big part of that; you can follow the search at setiquest. There are dozens of other instruments that may provide data to help with SETI, and more than a half-dozen on the drawing boards for the next decade or so.

“This is a hard job,” Tarter said. “This is a lot of very difficult technology to get this job done.”

“Whether or not SETI succeeds in the near term, it has another job to do,” Tarter concluded. “Whether or not it ever finds a signal, it has another job to do. And that is holding up a mirror to all of us on this planet and showing us that in that mirror, when compared to something else out there, we are all the same. Talking about SETI, thinking about SETI, listening to talks about SETI, helps to transfer and to encourage this cosmic perspective. It helps to trivialize the differences among us.”

Tarter encouraged everyone to go home and set their discriptions on their social media profiles to “Earthling,” and to start thinking and acting from that perspective.

“SETI is a very good exercise at working globally to solve a problem,” she said, “and there are many problems that we are going to have to solve quickly in the near term, and do so as a global community.”

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Celebrating three years of Astronomy on Tap Seattle

Astronomy on Tap Seattle observed its third anniversary last month, and celebrated by breaking format, with updates on talks from the past year and some new tidbits of information.

One of the fun new items was a story by Dr. James Davenport about how he helped convince NASA to use the Kepler space telescope to take a selfie of Earth.

“This is a personal story,” Davenport explained. “This is a story about an image that we asked NASA to take, and they were kind enough to take it.”

It took more than a year of cajoling, using the usual bureaucratic channels and also social media campaigns to get the shot.

Selfie from space

Selfie from space: Earth as observed by Kepler in December. (Image: NASA)

“We guilted them into taking this picture that we wanted for no other value than just to have this amazing image,” Davenport said. He noted that NASA has a long tradition of taking photos of the home planet, starting with the “Earthrise” photo from Apollo 8 and going through the “Pale Blue Dot” image from Voyager and the more recent pic of Earth from Cassini at Saturn.

The Kepler telescope usually points away from Earth, but sometimes NASA moves the aim to look at a different part of the sky, and that’s when Earth can move through the scope’s field of view. This happened on December 10, 2017, and that’s when Kepler got this shot. Now, Kepler usually looks a dim objects that are far away—a typical exposure is about 30 minutes. This isn’t the best setup for taking a photo of Earth from about 94 million miles.

“We expected it to look like a bright mess,” Davenport said. “We were not disappointed.”

It’s a personal story for Davenport because he was doing an entirely different thesis project for his Ph.D. program when Kepler came on line. He was so excited about the hunt for exoplanets that he ditched his other thesis and started working with Kepler.

“It represented a huge turning point in my career,” he said.

Polarimetry

Back in September Kim Bott gave a talk about how she and other astronomers are using polarimetry to try to figure out if exoplanets are habitable or inhabited. Since then she’s done some actual modeling of Venus at various phases to see if polarimetry can tell us what we need to know.

The short answer appears to be no, at least for right now. The instruments simply aren’t senstive enough to detect the changes in light wiggle that might reveal a variety of indicators.

“It’s just a couple orders of magnitude,” Bott explained, “so something that we might be able to obtain within the next decade” as the technology improves.

Trappist 1

The planets around the star Trappist 1 have attracted a lot of interest since they were discovered beginning in 2015. There are seven planets in all orbiting this red dwarf star; they’re all roughly the size of Earth, and three of them orbit within the star’s habitable zone.

Trappist-1 system“These are planets that could be a lot like Earth, that could potentially support life,” said Dr. Rodrigo Luger, adding that this is an active area of research. Luger said it’s interesting that all seven planets are in orbital resonance.

“There’s a very distinct pattern linking the orbital periods of all seven planets,” he said. Interestingly enough, this resonance and the gravitational influence the planets have on each other makes the transit times of the planets change from orbit to orbit.

“It’s just like when you’re at the bus stop here in Seattle,” he explained. “Sometimes the bus comes early, sometimes it’s on time, sometimes it’s late. Transits are the same way.”

This gives astronomers a lot of information about the system.

“By studying the transit time variations you can actually get the mass of the planets because you know how strong their gravity is,” Luger said. “Because of the geometry of the system we can get the radius of the planets—the size when it transits the star—and by doing some clever numerology and math we can figure out their mass. If you have the radius and the mass you actually have the density, so you have an idea what these planets are made of.”

It turns out that the Trappist planets mostly appear to be of lower density than Earth and Venus. This could mean that the planets have large amounts of water or large hydrogen atmospheres.

“These planets are going to be studied a ton in the next decade to figure out if in fact they are habitable,” Luger said.

Astronomy on Tap Seattle co-founder Brett Morris noted that much future study of exoplanets was to have been done by the James Webb Space Telescope, but the recent decision to delay the launch of that instrument has been disappointing to many.

“That affected some people a lot,” Morris said. “Some of those people were me!”

When the announcement that the launch would be pushed out to 2020 was made last month, Morris and others were coming up on what was an April 6 deadline to propose observing targets for the Webb.

“We were all working really hard because this telescope is super cool and it’s going to be the one that’s going to tell us if these planets are actually habitable and what’s going on in their atmospheres,” Morris noted. “Then the rug got pulled out from under us.”

R-process is better than your process

Back in July Trevor Dorn-Wallenstein told the AoT crowd how the universe makes beer for us. Last month he explained how heavier elements are made, and how we now know that theory to be true.

Dorn-Wallenstein explained how elements are made within stars. Typically, when neutrons collide with protons, they are captured. Nature stabilizes this through a process known as beta decay; the neutron just turns into a proton. This causes the release of an electron and a neutrino, or maybe an anti-neutrino.

“The jury is still out on whether neutrinos are the same as anti-neutrinos,” Dorn-Wallenstein observed. In any case these particles just go away.

“What we’ve really done here is we’ve converted one of those neutrons into a proton, and in doing so we’ve made a whole new element,” Dorn-Wallenstein said. “We’ve gone from hydrogen to helium, though both are unstable and have oddball numbers of neutrons.”

This happens slowly—that’s why it’s called the s-process. It occurs in low-mass stars, which can make strontium, barium, and lead.

Then there’s the r-process, which is rapid. In this process neutrons get bombarded onto atomic nuclei so quickly that beta decay can’t happen, and you get ridiculously unstable nuclei. Eventually neutron capture either slows, or it becomes so unstable that beta decay happens all at once, and BAM, you’re making silver, gold, platinum, and other heavier elements.

Essentially to do this you need three big explosions. First you need two supernovae to leave behind a pair of neutron stars. Then the neutron stars need to merge. Their collision is called a kilonova.

“There’s a lot of free neutrons around, and maybe those free neutrons are created rapidly enough that the r-process occurs,” Dorn-Wallenstein said. To confirm this you’d need to see evidence of a neutron star collision, a gamma-ray burst from the event, and follow up to make sure r-process elements were actually being formed. That’s exactly what happened when LIGO detected gravitational waves from a neutron star merger back in August.

“We found evidence that r-process elements were being formed and it confirmed that neutron star mergers were the dominant sites of the r-process,” Dorn-Wallenstein concluded.

Exoplanet instruments

Back in August Lupita Tovar did a talk about LUVOIR and SAMURAI and how they will help us map exoplanets. Her latest interest is the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite—TESS—which launched April 18. Its primary mission is to search for Earths and super-Earths. While Kepler looked at a relatively small swath of sky, TESS will scan about 80 percent of the sky and observe some 200,000 stars.

“You can imagine how many more things we’re going to be finding,” Tovar marveled. TESS will look at brighter stars than Kepler was able to observe, and will be a constant source of data. It will send back full-frame images every half hour or so, and about 200,000 smaller “postage stamp” images every two minutes.

“What that translates to is a whole lot of data that’s going to be coming down from this telescope,” Tovar said. “You’re going to get a lot of planets—planets everywhere!”

There could be as many as 20,000 new ones; Tovar said many will likely be gas giants, which are easier to spot.

SPAMS a lot

UW student Aislynn Wallach is involved in a project called The Search for Planets Around post-Main Sequence Stars—SPAMSS.

The question is what becomes of planets like Earth when their host stars become red giants.

“They blow up to a larger size, much like a marshmallow in a microwave,” Wallach said. After that the stars become white dwarfs. The prospects for the close-in planets aren’t good.

“Anything inside (the expanded red giant) will probably be disintegrated,” Wallach noted. “That’s what we’re looking for we’re trying to find—these broken up planets around stars like the Sun.”

The approach is to look at the spectra of white dwarf stars. If we spot heavier elements in those spectra, the elements will have come from ripped-up planets. If those materials were part of the star, they would sink quickly from its surface.

For her search Wallach has been using the ARCSAT (Astrophysical Research Consortium Small Aperture Telescope) at the Apache Point observatory in New Mexico. Results of her search so far: nothing.

“Nothing is still a result!” She laughs. The search continues.

The beautiful music of the universe

An interesting new approach to data is to turn it into sound. Locke Patton is doing this with the brightness of supernovae. Brighter data points are assigned higher musical pitches. The process is called sonification.

“We don’t just look at it, we listen to it,” said Patton of the data.

Sadly, his recording of a supernova sound didn’t play—a rare technical glitch at Astronomy on Tap Seattle. He sang it. Sort of! You can hear a recording here.

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The search for Earth 2.0

Astronomers have to date discovered more than 3,700 exoplanets—planets in orbit around stars other than our Sun. With each discovery, someone wants to know if the newly discovered planet is like Earth.

Elizabeth Tasker

Elizabeth Tasker at Astronomy on Tap Seattle.

Elizabeth Tasker thinks that’s not a very good question. Tasker, associate professor at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science and author of The Planet Factory: Exoplanets and the Search for a Second Earth (Bloomsbury Sigma, 2017) gave a talk at the most recent edition of Astronomy on Tap Seattle. She said that some of the exoplanets confirmed so far have at least a little resemblance to Earth.

“Roughly one third of those are approximately Earth-sized, by which I mean their physical radius is less than twice ours,” Tasker said. News media often wish to leap from that to describing a planet as Earth-LIKE, but Tasker said we don’t have nearly enough information to make that sort of call. Our current methods of detecting an exoplanet can give us either its radius or its minimum mass, and a pretty good read of its distance from its host star.

“The problem is neither of those directly relates to what’s going on on the surface,” Tasker noted. Part of the challenge is what Tasker feels is the somewhat oversimplified notion of the “habitable zone” around a star, a band of distance in which liquid water—a key to life as we know it—could exist on a planet’s surface.

“Like all real-estate contracts, there is small print,” Tasker said. “Just because you’re inside the habitable zone doesn’t mean you’re an Earth-like planet. Indeed, of all the planets we’ve found in the habitable zone around their stars, there are five times as many planets that are very likely to be gas giants like Jupiter than have any kind of solid surface.”

Another misleading metric that has been used is something called the “Earth similarity index.” This method compared exoplanets to Earth on the basis of properties such as density, radius, escape velocity, and surface temperature.

“None of these four conditions actually measure surface conditions at all,” Tasker said, pointing out that the index didn’t take into account such features as plate tectonics, a planet’s seasons, it’s magnetic fields, greenhouse gases, or existence of water. We can’t observe any of those things about exoplanets yet. As an example of the flaws of the index, Venus came out at 0.9, pretty similar to Earth, which is at 1.0 on the zero-to-one scale. While Venus is about the size of Earth and is around the inner edge of the Sun’s habitable zone, its surface temperature could melt lead. Not very Earth-like, or habitable. It’s one of the reasons that the index is seldom used these days. So we don’t have much of a clue about conditions on any of the known exoplanets.

“Our next generation of telescopes is going to change that,” Tasker said. She noted that NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope is scheduled to launch next year, the ESA’s Ariel in 2026, and the UK’s Twinkle in the next year or so.

“All of these are aiming at looking at atmospheres, and these may be able to tell us what is going on on the surface, and may even give us the first sniff of life on another planet,” Tasker said. “Maybe then we’ll be able to talk seriously about Earth 2.0.”

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Serious fun with astronomy, history, and literature

The University of Washington College of Arts and Sciences is presenting a monthly Serious Fun Lecture series, and the event next week includes Brett Morris, co-founder of Astronomy on Tap Seattle and a Ph.D. candidate in the dual-title Astronomy and Astrobiology Program. Morris will be one of three speakers to tackle the topic “Secrets and Mysteries.”

Brett Morris

Brett Morris

“We hope to evoke your curiosity, with mysteries and secrets across disciplines,” Morris said. “I’m honored to be speaking alongside two distinguished faculty who work in history and literature, and wade into mysteries just as much as astronomers do. I’ll tell the story of one of the most important astronomers you’ve never heard of, and the mystery she uncovered in our Universe—and how we might solve it.”

The other speakers will be Andrew Nestingen, Chair and associate professor in the Scandinavian Studies Department, and Laurie Sears, Walker Endowed Professor in History.

The lecture will be held at 7 p.m. next Wednesday, February 21, in the Brechemin Auditorium, which is on the east end of the School of Music’s main floor in the Music Building on the UW campus in Seattle. The lecture is free but registration is required.

A March lecture in the series will be about dragons, and in April they’ll take on time.

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Calendar: UW colloquium and AOT Seattle this week

A couple of interesting talks and no less than five club meetings fill the astronomy event calendar for this week.

UW Astronomy Colloquium

Juno at Jupiter

Juno at Jupiter. Image: NASA

Come learn about what the Juno mission is accomplishing at Jupiter. Sam Gulkis of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, one of the co-investigators for Juno, will speak at the University of Washington astronomy colloquium at 4 p.m. Thursday, February 15 in the Physics/Astronomy Auditorium on the UW campus in Seattle. Often the colloquia are a little heavy for the non-scientist audience, but this one sounds approachable. Gulkis will discuss how Juno peeks under Jupiter’s clouds using microwaves and other techniques, and he’ll fill us in on some of the mission’s early findings.

Astronomy on Tap Seattle

AOT Feb 2018Astronomy on Tap Seattle has an unusual Friday gathering this month, with two talks, astronomy trivia, and great prizes on the docket for 7 p.m. February 16 at Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard. The topic for the evening will be Cosmic Explorers. Dr. Jen Sobeck, a senior research scientist in the UW Department of Astronomy, will talk about the Harvard Computers—the women who mapped the sky! Dr. Elizabeth Tasker, author of The Planet Factory: Exoplanets and the Search for a Second Earth (Bloomsbury Sigma, 2017) will talk about “Earth 2.0” and the search for a habitable world. (By the way, if you buy the book from that link, Seattle Astronomy gets a small royalty at no cost to you! It helps us do what we do. Thanks!)

AOT is free, but remember to buy beer. Bring a lawn chair to create your own front-row seating!

Cosmic love

The Washington State University Planetarium in Pullman has a special show planned for Valentine’s Day, Wednesday, February 14. “Some Like It Hot” will show at 7 p.m. and again at 8:30. It’s not the movie with Marilyn Monroe, and Tony Curtis; this planetarium show is all about temperature—from the frigid to the muy caliente, the universe has it all.

Admission is $5 cash or check at the door. No credit cards are accepted at the planetarium.

Check our calendar page for a list of links to other planetaria in the area.

Astronomy club meetings

The Island County Astronomical also plans a public star party for 7 p.m. Friday, February 16 at Fort Nugent Park in Oak Harbor.

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