Tag Archives: Everett Astronomical Society

Calendar: club events open December

As we flip the calendar to December, there are a couple of good headline events, four astronomy club meetings, and several educational events to look forward to.

Astronaut and mountaineer Scott Parazinski is the only person ever to have both flown in space and stood on the top of Mount Everest. He’ll be at the Museum of Flight at 2 p.m. on Saturday, December 9 to talk about his experiences and his new book, The Sky Below: A True Story of Summits, Space, and Speed (Little A, 2017). Parazinski will sign copies of the book after his talk, which is free with museum admission.

If you can’t make it Saturday, you can pick up the book by clicking the link above or the book cover at left; Seattle Astronomy gets a small royalty at no cost to you when you purchase this way, and it helps support our operations. Thanks so much!

Life in Space

The Pacific Science Center’s Science in the City lecture series continues at 7 p.m. Wednesday, December 6 with a program called Life in Space. Three University of Washington astrobiologists will discuss their research—including the search for planets around other stars, characterizing how stars influence the habitability of those planets, and techniques to mix computer modeling with data analysis to determine the characteristics of potentially habitable worlds. Two of the three presenters will be familiar to Seattle Astronomy readers. Brett Morris is a PhD candidate of astronomy and astrobiology at the University of Washington and is a co-founder and co-host of the popular Astronomy on Tap Seattle events. Dr. Erika Harnett is a research associate professor and was featured on the blog and podcast this year. The “new guy” is Marshall “Moosh” Styczinski, a grad student who does research using magnetic fields to peel back the icy crust of Jupiter’s moons, looking for places that life may be found.

After viewing the documentary The Search for Life in Space, the trio will answer questions about their research and other topics addressed in the film.

Tickets to Life in Space are $5, free for Pacific Science Center members.

Astronomy club activity

Four clubs have their monthly meetings this week:

In addition, two clubs have public outreach events on Saturday. The BP Astro Kids on Bainbridge Island will make LED holiday cards during sessions at 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. at the Ritchie Observatory on Bainbridge Island. Following at 7:30 p.m. the Battle Point Astronomical Association monthly planetarium show will focus on how neutron stars make gold, and how we can tell they’re doing it. The Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold one of its public nights at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, December 9 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The indoor presentation will be a viewing of the movie The Christmas Star. At both the Battle Point and Tacoma events there will be stargazing if the weather permits.

###

Please support Seattle Astronomy with a subscription through Patreon.

Become a Patron!

Share

Several club events on this week’s calendar

Use your snow day to plan your astronomy activities for the week! Four area astronomy clubs have meetings on the calendar.

The Tacoma Astronomical Society will meet at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, February 7 in room 175 of Thompson Hall at the University of Puget Sound. Member John Finnian will make a presentation about the app Dark Sky Finder, including a demonstration of how it works and advice about how to get the most use value from it, particularly for stargazers who may wish to use it for finding potentially very good observing sites in the Northwest.

The Boeing Employees Astronomical Association will meet at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, February 9 in room 201 of the Boeing “Oxbow” Fitness & Recreation Center, Bldg 9-150. The topic will be the upcoming total solar eclipse and advice about how to successfully observe it. Non-Boeing folks are welcome but must RSVP; details online.

Saturday, February 11 will be a busy day on Bainbridge Island with three events scheduled with the Battle Point Astronomical Association. The BP Astro Kids program has shows about gravity at 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. Following at 7:30 p.m. astronomer Dave Fong will do a Valentine’s themed show titled, “Star Stories: Twisted Tales of Love and Loss.” It’s a humorous take on Greek star lore. If the weather is good they’ll break out the telescopes for observing. It all happens at the association’s observatory and planetarium in Battle Point Park.

The Everett Astronomical Society will meet at 3 p.m. Saturday, February 11 at the Evergreen Branch of the Everett Public Library. Program topics had not been published as of this writing.

Planetaria

Check our calendar page for this week’s planetarium shows at the Pacific Science Center and the WSU planetarium, and for other upcoming astronomy events.

Up in the sky

There will be a penumbral lunar eclipse this Saturday, February 11. The eclipse will already be in progress at moonrise in Seattle, and will end a little before 7 p.m. It’s the only lunar eclipse that will be visible from North America this year. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope offer more observing highlights for the week.

Share

Astro calendar for the week of March 7

A couple of astronomy club meetings, some star parties, and a space-themed art show are on the docket for the coming week.

Olympic Astronomical SocietyThe Olympic Astronomical Society will meet at 7:30 p.m. Monday, March 7 in room 103 of the Art Building on the campus of Olympic College in Bremerton. Topics planned for discussion include the Mercury transit coming up in May, the Astronomical League‘s Double Star Club, white dwarf supernovae, and the club’s annual Spring Camp Delany Star Party, which will be held May 4–8 at Sun Lakes State Park.

The Everett Astronomical Society will meet at 3 p.m. Saturday, March 12 at the Evergreen Branch of the Everett Public Library. We could find no information about program topics or guest speakers as of this writing.

Star parties

saslogoThe Seattle Astronomical Society plans its free monthly public star parties for 7 p.m. Saturday, March 12 at two locations: Green Lake in Seattle and Paramount Park in Shoreline. Club members will be on hand with telescopes for observing. Bad weather will cancel the events; watch the club’s website or social media for updates.

Giant steps art show continues

NASA photo.

NASA photo.

The Giant Steps art exhibition and contest continues Saturday and Sunday at Seattle’s King Street Station, where it will be open from noon until 6 p.m. both days. The event challenged students, artists, engineers, architects, designers, and other space enthusiasts to imagine and propose art projects on the surface of the Moon. Their submissions will be on display at the station weekends through the end of March. Admission is $10.

Up in the sky

Jupiter will be at opposition Tuesday, and Venus appears close to the Moon on Monday.  The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope have other observing highlights for the week.

 

Share

Lots of astronomy club activity this week

There’s a lot of activity on the calendar with area astronomy clubs this week, including five different events on Saturday.

The Boeing Employees Astronomical Society starts things off with its regular meeting Thursday. Social hour at the Boeing Oxbow fitness center will begin at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 11, with the meeting following at 7 p.m. The program will be a presentation about “Saturn’s Magnificent Moons and Rings.”

People who do not work at Boeing can attend, but should follow info here to RSVP and gain admission.

Busy Saturday

The Everett Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 13 at the Evergreen Branch of the Everett Public Library. As of this writing the program topic had not been published.

saslogoThe Seattle Astronomical Society plans its free monthly public star parties for 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 13 at two locations: Green Lake in Seattle and Paramount Park in Shoreline. Bad weather cancels the star parties, so watch the society’s website for updates.

BPAAThe Battle Point Astronomical Association will run a Valentine’s-themed planetarium program at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at its Ritchie Observatory in Battle Point Park on Bainbridge Island. The program, “Star Stories: Twisted Tales of Love & Loss” will explore tales from ancient star lore. If the weather permits astronomers will be on hand with telescopes for some observing. A kids’ show and the building of “Love Bots” will precede the main show at 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. Free to BPAA members, suggested $2 donation for non-members, $5 for families.

taslogoThe Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold one of its free public nights at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. An all-weather presentation will look at “110 Celestial Objects.” It sounds like a review of the Messier catalog. Observing will follow, weather permitting.

Check our calendar for more planetarium events; we’ve recently added information about programs at the Willard Smith Planetarium at Pacific Science Center and at the WSU Planetarium in Pullman.

Up in the sky

The Moon passes near both Neptune and Uranus this week. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope have other observing highlights for the week.

Share

Seattle Astronomy calendar, week of May 4

Local organizations are hosting special space and astronomy events and other regular astro-club functions are on the docket for this week.

The Museum of Flight observes Space Day as part of its Free First Thursday May 7. Local astronomy clubs will be there with telescopes for viewing—Mercury, Venus, Jupiter, and Saturn are all great targets this week. In addition, NASA Solar System Ambassador Ron Hobbs will give a presentation about the Hubble Space Telescope. Space Day runs from 5 p.m. until 9 p.m. The Hobbs talk will start at 7 p.m.

PacSci arches

The arches at the Pacific Science Center. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

The Pacific Science Center observes Astronomy Day Saturday, May 9 starting at 10 a.m. and running all day. It will be a day of arts and crafts, planetarium shows, and other fun activities. Volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society will be on hand with solar telescopes for safe viewing of the Sun, if the Sun is indeed out that day. Guest presenters include retired astronaut Dr. Nick Patrick, who will give a talk at 2 p.m., and Dr. Tom McCord from the NASA Dawn mission, who will speak at 3 p.m. Find the full schedule on the PacSci website.

Tacoma Astronomical Society

The Tacoma Astronomical Society holds its monthly meeting Tuesday, May 5 at 7:30 p.m. in room 175 of Thompson Hall at the University of Puget Sound. Then on Saturday, May 9, they’ll have a public observing night from 9 p.m until midnight at the Fort Stielacoom campus of Pierce College. Presenter John Finnan will talk about binocular astronomy—a rewarding and inexpensive way to get started in the hobby.

Back at TJO

TJO

The Theodor Jacobsen Observatory at the University of Washington. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

Wednesday night, May 6, is open house night at the Theodor Jacobsen Observatory on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. The event runs from 9–11 p.m. Two talks by UW undergraduates are scheduled. Riley Harris will give a talk at 9 p.m. titled, “The State of the Planet, The Future of Space Travel.” Harris will run down the history of space travel, take an honest look at the current state of Earth, and explore the possibilities for future space travel and colonization. At 9:30 p.m. Kyle Musselwhite will give a talk titled, “Hey, What’s That Sound? The Universe!” Musselwihite will outline relationships between the history of science and musical thinking, then discuss why music is a useful tool for conceptualizing certain properties of the universe (especially time and distance). Volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society will be on hand to give a peek through the observatory’s vintage telescope if weather permits. Reservations are strongly suggested for the talks.

Everett society meets

The Everett Astronomical Society holds its monthly meeting Saturday, May 9 beginning at 3 p.m. at the Evergreen Branch of the Everett Public Library.

Share

Seattle Astronomy calendar, week of April 6

A salute to the Mercury Seven, plus a planetarium show and Yuri’s Night highlight the Seattle Astronomy calendar for this week.

Mercury Seven

The Mercury Seven. Front row L-R: Schirra, Slayton, Glenn, and Carpenter. Back row: Shepard, Grissom, Cooper. Photo: NASA.

It was 56 years ago April 9, in 1959, that NASA announced which men had been selected as the Mercury Seven, the first group of U.S. Astronauts. The seven were Scott Carpenter, Gordon Cooper, John Glenn, Gus Grissom, Wally Schirra, Alan Shepard, and Deke Slayton. The death of Carpenter in 2013 left Glenn as the only living member of the original astronaut corps.

Tom Wolfe’s book The Right Stuff is a fascinating telling of the story of the astronauts, and the 1983 movie version of the book, directed by Philip Kaufman, is fantastic as well. I still chuckle at the cast names: Ed Harris played John Glenn, Scott Glenn portrayed Alan Shepard, and Sam Shepard was cast as Chuck Yeager. There’s also a local note on the film; Seattle actress Pamela Reed portrayed Trudy Cooper, Gordo’s wife. Reed recently had a recurring role in the TV series Parks and Recreation, and was on the Seattle stage as Martha in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? at the Seattle Rep last year.

Yuri’s Night

LogoYurisNight_WHITEring_TRANSPARENTbackground250x250Sunday, April 12, marks the 54th anniversary of human spaceflight. On that date in 1961 Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first person launched into space. Worldwide on and around this date there are many observances of Yuri’s Night to commemorate the feat.

Only two area events are registered on the Yuri’s Night website. The Seattle Chapter of the National Space Society will meet at 7 p.m. Sunday, April 12 at the Museum of Flight, and a Yuri’s Night observance will be held next Saturday, April 18 at 5 p.m. at the Pearson Air Museum in Vancouver, Washington.

Club events

At lot of eyes were on the sky on April 11, 1986 when Halley’s Comet made its closest approach to Earth during its most recent visit to the inner solar system. Area clubs will be looking skyward this Saturday to mark the date.

The Everett Astronomical Society holds its monthly meeting at 3 p.m. April 11 at the main downtown branch of the Everett Public Library. Program details had not been announced as of this writing.

That evening beginning at 7:30 the Battle Point Astronomical Association hosts a planetarium program and evening of observing at its Edwin Ritchie Observatory in Battle Point Park on Bainbridge Island. The program topic is telescopes: the great ones of history, new ones on the drawing boards, and which one is right for you. Club members will be on hand with scopes for observing if weather permits.

Share