Tag Archives: John Logsdon

Apollo 11 50th anniversary reading list

I’m giving a series of six talks this summer at various branches of Tacoma Public Library about the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission and the first humans to walk on the Moon. It’s part of the library’s summer reading club. My talk includes some suggested reading about Apollo. Here’s what I recommend:

A lot of the material for my talk came from James Donovan‘s excellent book Shoot for the Moon: The Space Race and the extraordinary Voyage of Apollo 11 (Little, Brown and Company, 2019). Apollo 11 command module pilot Michael Collins calls the book “The best book on Apollo that I have read.”

Shoot for the Moon takes us on a tour of the space race from Sputnik up through the Apollo missions. Marvelously detailed and highly accessible, I could hardly put it down. It’s a marvelous chronicle of this great adventure.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library

Seattle Public Library


Rod Pyle‘s First on the Moon: The Apollo 11 50th Anniversary Experience (Sterling, 2019) includes a forward by the mission’s Buzz Aldrin, second man to walk on the Moon. It’s a beautifully illustrated volume that is a fitting commemoration of Apollo 11.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library (N/A)

Seattle Public Library


Charles Fishman‘s One Giant Leap: The Impossible Mission That Flew Us to the Moon (somebody, 2019) focuses on many of the people behind the scenes—technicians, engineers, scientists—who made the Moon landing possible. About 400,000 people in all worked on some aspect of the Apollo missions.

Fishman gave a talk about the book June 28 at Town Hall Seattle but unfortunately I wasn’t able to attend. The book is next on my nightstand, though.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library

Seattle Public Library


David Whitehouse‘s Apollo 11: The Inside Story (Icon Books, 2019) is based on the author’s interviews with a host of astronauts, NASA personnel, politicians, and other insiders to tell the tale about how Apollo came about.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library (N/A)

Seattle Public Library (N/A)

 


Richard Maurer‘s Destination Moon: The Remarkable and Improbable Voyage of Apollo 11 (Roaring Book Press, 2019) goes back in time. While most tales about the space race start with Sputnik, Maurer begins with fighter pilots in World War II. He traces the origins of the Apollo program to a few exceptional soldiers, a Nazi engineer, and a young eager man who would become president.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library

Seattle Public Library


The Space Race: The Journey to the Moon and Beyond (DK Children, 2019) by Sarah Cruddas is targeted for kids from ages 6–9 and takes them from the race to the Moon to the future and the possibility of perhaps one day living on Mars.

The Space Race includes a forward by Eileen Collins, the first women to be commander of a space shuttle mission.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library

Seattle Public Library


Two books by John M. Logsdon, founder and long-time director of the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University, wrap up our list. They’re not new, but both offer interesting discussions of the public policy debates behind the Space Race and how the decisions changed the future of U.S. space exploration.

John F. Kennedy and the Race to the Moon (Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology, 2010) and After Apollo?: Richard Nixon and the American Space Program (Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology, 2015) are great reads for those interested in public policy and how challenging decisions are made. The books are relevant now as we observe the anniversary of Apollo, and as we consider the pros and cons of a return to the Moon and possible future missions to Mars.

Check out our 2015 article about Logsdon’s discussion of the future of space exploration given at that winter’s meeting of the American Astronomical Society.


Books marked at N/A at the library branches were not listed in their catalogs as of June 30, 2019. They may be on the way, as most of the titles are fresh off the presses. If you purchase from Amazon through the links above, a small percentage of the sale comes to Seattle Astronomy at no cost to you. This helps support our work on astronomy journalism.

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Gifts for the astronomy enthusiast on your list

Many Seattle Astronomy readers seem to be looking for gifts to give to the astro-enthusiasts on their lists this time of year, and often ask us for advice. We have some!

It doesn’t change much from year to year. Check our posts Gifts for the astronomy enthusiast from last year, Picking a gift for the astronomy buff from 2013, and Choosing a gift telescope from 2012. Too busy to scrape around in the past? A few quick tips:

Visit the Seattle Astronomy Store. It’s packed with our favorite gear, books we’ve read from authors we’ve interviewed, cameras, gadgets, and accessories.

Trying to pick a first telescope for someone? The book The Backyard Astronomer’s Guide (Firefly Books, 2008) by Terence Dickinson and Alan Dyer is a great reference, offers fantastic advice about what to consider when choosing a telescope, and makes a great gift in and of itself. It helped me get started, lo those many years ago, and I still use it often. This is the best gift for anyone who is interested in amateur astronomy, but who may not have much idea about how to get started in the hobby.

More books

It’s great to be able to read about astronomy in an area in which rain and clouds are the norm about 11 months of the year. While our store has a big selection, there are a number of good choices that are new in the last year or so, and whose authors have made presentations here in town.

What Is Relativity?: An Intuitive Introduction to Einstein’s Ideas, and Why They Matter (Columbia University Press, 2014) by Jeffrey Bennett is a wonderfully approachable primer on a topic that many people find mind bending, perhaps just because it never gets explained so well. Pick this one up and your gift recipient will be explaining the fabric of spacetime to one and all. Bennett did an interview with us in March and spoke at the April meeting of the Seattle Astronomical Society. He’s been touring the country in support of the book in observance of the 100th anniversary of the Theory of Relativity.

Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs: The Astounding Interconnectedness of the Universe (Ecco, 2015). Harvard astrophysicist Lisa Randall did a talk at Town Hall Seattle in November. Her idea about how dark matter may have done in the large reptiles 65 million years ago is an interesting and relatively simple one. Her research for the next few years will be focused on trying to find evidence that her notion is valid, and that a type of particle of dark matter that reacts to “dark light” may be behind mass extinctions.

Spooky Action at a Distance: The Phenomenon That Reimagines Space and Time–and What It Means for Black Holes, the Big Bang, and Theories of Everything (Scientific American / Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2015). Author George Musser also talked at Town Hall in November and took a shot at explaining quantum entanglement. He noted that we’re starting to see the hazy outlines of an answer to questions about the how particles in different locations appear to act on each other, but adds that there are still scientists who don’t really believe that non-locality is a real thing.

After Apollo?: Richard Nixon and the American Space Program (Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology) and John F. Kennedy and the Race to the Moon (Both Palgrave Macmillan, 2015 and 2010, respectively). Space historian John Logsdon did two speeches in Seattle this year, one at the meeting of the American Astronomical Society back in January, and the other in June at the Museum of Flight. He insterestingly described the race to the Moon as a one-sided one that we almost lost anyway. A perfect couple of volumes for those interested in the history of space exploration.

The End of Night: Searching for Natural Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light by Paul Bogard. This isn’t a new book, but we absolutely love it for its beautiful writing as well as its important message. Bogard spoke in Seattle two years ago and we’ve been raving about the book ever since.

Emily Lackdawalla of the Planetary Society did a post last year with suggestions for astronomy books for children, and Bennett has also done a number of acclaimed books for children, with links included at the end of our post based on our interview with him.

New experts in town

Cloud Break OpticsIf you’re looking for gear there are new experts in town to help you out. Cloud Break Optics opened earlier this year in Ballard, and it’s the first astronomy shop in town ages that is owned and operated by and for amateur astronomers. Stephanie Anderson and Matt Dahl are the proprietors, they know their stuff, and are more than happy to share. They take online orders, but why not drop by, meet some new friends, see all of those telescopes and eyepieces and gadgets in person, and buy from your local small business.

Cameras

We are decidedly not astrophotographers, but our friend The Soggy Astronomer is, and he wrote an article earlier this year about good camera choices for this aspect of the hobby. Our post gives a brief summary, and his top picks are included in our store.

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Astronomy on Tap and more this week

Happy Moon landing day! July 20 marks the 46th anniversary of the day Neil Armstrong took that giant leap for mankind and became the first human being to walk on the Moon!

For those interested in a little history, we’ve read a couple of good books about the race to the Moon lately. Space policy maven John Logsdon penned John F. Kennedy and the Race to the Moon (Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology, 2013). It’s an interesting account of the race that really wasn’t, and the pitfalls that nearly derailed the Apollo program before it got going. Logsdon has spoken in Seattle twice this year; check out our accounts of his address to the American Astronomical Society in January and of a talk last month at the Museum of Flight.

The second Moon book is of particular interest to public relations and marketing professionals. Marketing the Moon: The Selling of the Apollo Lunar Program (MIT Press, 2014) by David Meerman Scott and Richard Jurek was one of our favorite books of last year. It’s loaded with great stories and lots of images of some of the marketing materials that helped sell the Apollo program. Check out our review here. The books are available by clicking the handy links above. They and more are also featured in the Seattle Astronomy Store.

Astronomy and beer

aot5posterHey, didn’t we just have Astronomy on Tap Seattle last week? Yes, we did; it was a special Pluto and New Horizons edition. Read our recap of the event. This Wednesday, July 22 at 7 p.m. AoT will be back at Bad Jimmy’s Brewing Company in Ballard. There will be brief talks by UW grad students in astronomy, and there’s always plenty of time for Q&A. This week Rodrigo Luger, exoplaneteer extraordinaire, will speak about “Syzygies in Silhouette: The Search For Alien Earths,” and James “JRAD” Davenport, connoisseur of small stars and big flares, will discuss “How Stars Keep Active as They Age.” There also will be trivia games and prizes. Hot tip: the prizes often are in the form of treats from Trophy Cupcakes, decorated in relevant astronomical ways, though past history is not necessarily an indicator of future performance. In any event, astronomy is great with a nice cold brew. Astronomy on Tap is free, but please RSVP.

Star parties

The Seattle Astronomical Society will hold its free monthly public star parties at Green Lake in Seattle and at Paramount Park in Shoreline this Saturday, July 25. The star parties get under way at 9 p.m., presuming the weather is good. And when was the last time you saw a cloud? Go take a peek!

What’s up in the sky?

Saturn will appear just two degrees south of the Moon on Sunday night, July 26. Check Sky & Telescope magazine’s This Week’s Sky at a Glance for other observing highlights.

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One-sided race to the Moon nearly derailed

It’s a popular narrative that the race to land a man on the Moon in the 1960s was launched by President John F. Kennedy in a speech to Congress in May of 1961, and was a gung-ho, nonstop effort until the goal was achieved in 1969. In fact, the space policy expert Dr. John M. Logsdon says the whole thing was nearly undone in 1963.

John Logsdon

Space policy expert Dr. John Logsdon spoke June 13 at the Museum of Flight. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

Logsdon is the founder and longtime director of the Space Policy Institute at the George Washington University and author of John F. Kennedy and the Race to the Moon (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013) and After Apollo?: Richard Nixon and the American Space Program (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015). He gave a talk titled, “John Kennedy, Richard Nixon, and the American Space Program” last weekend at the Museum of Flight.

Logsdon pointed out some interesting contrasts between the two presidents. Richard Nixon was an early space booster, arguing for a civilian space agency when he was Vice President under Dwight Eisenhower. Some historians think of Nixon as the father of NASA. Meanwhile Kennedy didn’t have much interest in space until the Soviet Union launched Yuri Gagarin into orbit in April of 1961. This got Kennedy’s attention, and he gave his advisors the task of coming up with a space effort that the United States could win. Their answer was landing on the Moon, and that became Kennedy’s goal.

“It had very little to do with a view of humanity’s future in space or some romantic image of the space frontier,” Logsdon explained. “This was a Cold War, deliberate act of competition, seeing space as an area to demonstrate which social system, which governmental system was superior.”

Ramping up space spending

“Kennedy not only talked the talk, but he backed up his rhetoric with commitment,” Logsdon added. “This was a war-like mobilization of human and financial resources.”

Indeed, the NASA budget nearly doubled the first year and more than doubled again the second, and the skyrocketing cost came under considerable criticism. Kennedy was sensitive to this for a couple of reasons. He was concerned about the political impact of the Apollo program losing support, and worried that spending on space could be a negative in his 1964 re-election campaign. There was some talk of cutting the budget or relaxing the end-of-decade timeline for the goal. Kennedy also spoke openly of making the quest for a Moon a cooperative venture with the Soviet Union. Logsdon said that Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev originally expressed some interest in the idea, but was talked out of it by advisors worried that cooperation would reveal that the Russians really didn’t have lunar launch capability.

The one-sided race

“The United States was racing only itself,” Logsdon said of that lack of capability. “The Soviet Union, as of September of 1963, didn’t have a lunar program” and, in fact, didn’t decide to try until 1964.

“It was not reality as long as Kennedy was president. It became reality by the end of the decade,” Logsdon said.

Kennedy visited the launch center in Florida on Nov. 16, 1963 and was impressed by the rockets and the facilities.

“This visit excited Kennedy,” Logsdon said. “He came away from the visit full of regained enthusiasm for the program.”

On Nov. 21 Kennedy made a speech in San Antonio in which he said that the conquest of space must and will go ahead. He was assassinated the next day, and that ended any possibility that Apollo would be scrubbed. It became a memorial to the fallen president. Logsdon said it is interesting to speculate about what might have happened if JFK had lived or if Khrushchev had said “yes” to collaboration.

Logsdon said he doesn’t see Kennedy as a visionary in terms of humanity’s future in space.

“He was rather a pragmatic politician that saw a leadership-oriented space program as in the national interest in the particular situation of the early 1960s. He chose the lunar landing as a way of demonstrating the capabilities of this country,” Logsdon said.

Nixon and Apollo

Nixon was sworn in as president six months to the day before Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the Moon with Apollo 11.

“Unlike Kennedy, who saw space in geopolitical and foreign policy terms, Nixon viewed the space program as an issue of domestic politics: of technology, of innovation, of job creation, of something that is part of what the government does to stimulate society,” Logsdon said.

He contends that Nixon made three key decisions about space. He didn’t set a grand goal like going to the Moon or Mars. He opted to treat space exploration as just another one of the things that government does, nothing special. And his administration approved the space shuttle, though Logsdon said they chose to, “build a program around the shuttle without a long-term goal for the shuttle to serve.”

Logsdon said there may have been some wisdom there. A big goal, and an accompanying big budget, could have been a target, while a small, sustainable space program didn’t attract much opposition.

“Nixon was totally convinced of the importance of human spaceflight and of keeping astronauts in orbit, and that human spaceflight was essential to a U.S. leadership position,” Logsdon said. “He was intrigued by the various national security uses of the shuttle, which never happened.”

Naturally, electoral politics entered into it as well. The shuttle program created jobs in California, and Nixon needed to win California to gain re-election.

Logsdon is an engaging speaker and used a lot of video and audio clips in his presentation. His books are worth a look for anyone interested in the history of the space program. To buy the books click the links or book covers above, or visit the Seattle Astronomy Store.

More reading:

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Space policy dean, Curiosity engineer to speak in June at Museum of Flight

Our copy of Aloft, the member magazine of the Museum of Flight, arrived in the mail today bearing news of two interesting space talks planned for the museum in June.

John M. Logsdon, founder of the Space Policy Institute and considered by many to be the dean of U.S. space policy, will discuss his new book, After Apollo?: Richard Nixon and the American Space Program. The book is part of the series of Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology. In it, Logsdon takes a look at how President Nixon and his administration impacted post-Apollo space policy. Logsdon gave something of a preview of his presentation here in Seattle at the meeting of the American Astronomical Society in January. You can read our coverage of that talk to learn that Logsdon doesn’t think very highly of Nixon’s approach. Logsdon is scheduled to speak at 2 p.m. Saturday, June 13, 2015 in the William M. Allen Theater at the museum.

The following weekend Rob Manning will be in town to tout his aptly titled book, Mars Rover Curiosity: An Inside Account from Curiosity’s Chief Engineer (Smithsonian Books, 2014). Manning, who is indeed the chief engineer for the mission, will discuss the challenges of getting such a large and complicated robot safely to Mars to conduct science. Manning’s talk, also in the Allen Theater, will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, June 20.

You can pick up copies of the books by clicking the links or cover photos above, or by visiting the Seattle Astronomy Store. Keep track of any schedule changes by watching the Museum of Flight website. These events are so new that, as of this writing, they weren’t yet listed on the museum’s online calendar. We’re planning to cover both talks.

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A dim view of the future of funding for space exploration

Dr. John M. Logsdon does not paint a very optimistic picture of the future of funding for space exploration. Logsdon, considered the dean of space policy and the founder of the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University, gave a talk titled “What Do We Expect of a Space Program?” today at the 225th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Seattle.

John Logsdon

Dr. John Logsdon speaking Jan. 5, 2015, at the 225th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Seattle.

Logsdon pulled the title of his lecture from a line in a Nixon Administration memo about the future of the space program. He says a big part of the problem is that, in more than four decades since the memo, the underlying question has not been adequately answered.

Logsdon pins much of the blame for the situation on President Nixon, who scaled back funding for NASA after the race to the Moon was won.

“The decisions he made from the ’69 through ’71 period, culminating in the January 5, 1972 announcement of the approval of the space shuttle, really characterized the program that NASA executed for the next 40-plus years, and basically avoided answering the question ‘What do we expect?’ by developing capabilities rather than seeking goals,” Logsdon said.

We had the answer under President Kennedy, according to Logsdon, when the goal was not just to put people on the Moon, but to achieve preeminence about all things in outer space.

“What is distinctive about Kennedy is he not only talked the talk, but he walked the walk,” Logsdon said. “He made a commitment of human and financial resources, peaceful but warlike mobilization of resources, to carry out that program of preeminence.”

Logsdon pointed out that the budget for NASA was $964 million when JFK urged the US to go the Moon; it had ballooned to $5.2 billion by 1965. Space science shared in the growth, its part of the NASA budget going from $131 million to $767 million in the same time frame.

Logsdon is tackling the history of presidential support for space exploration in his scholarship. He published John F. Kennedy and the Race to the Moon in 2010. His new book, After Apollo?: Richard Nixon and the American Space Program, is due out in March. The latter goes into great detail about Nixon’s approach and its lasting impact.

While NASA’s budget has fluctuated over the years, Logsdon sees a silver lining in the nation’s investment in science.

“The ups and downs in the overall NASA budget are not reflected in the budget for space science, which has shown a rather gradual but steady increase for the past 25 or 30 years, and has not vacillated,” he said. “Compared to the human spaceflight part of NASA, the space science, robotic science program, including Earth science, is in pretty good shape and is not being argued about.”

Logsdon served on the Columbia Accident Investigation Board, which opined in 2003 that NASA was being forced to do too much without adequate resources. He said that’s still a problem. The reason he doesn’t see a good solution ahead is that there are three possible responses, two of which he views as unlikely. He doesn’t foresee a great increase in our ambitions or some Sputnik-like incident that creates urgency about space. Nor does he anticipate a significant increase in spending, though that could depend in part on who the next president turns out to be.

“The most likely outcome is that we just keep muddling along, as we have since 1971, with a suboptimal program,” he concluded.

Further reading:

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