Tag Archives: Museum of Flight

Astronaut visit, three club meetings this week

A talk by a visiting astronaut and three astronomy club meetings highlight the week on the Seattle Astronomy calendar, and two of the week’s featured events are on the west side of Puget Sound.

Astronaut Wilson speaks at MOF program

Stephanie Wilson

Astronaut Stephanie Wilson. Photo: NASA.

Astronaut Stephanie Wilson, the second African-American woman to travel to space, will give a talk at 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 6 at the Museum of Flight. Wilson, who flew on three shuttle missions, appears in recognition of Black History Month and in conjunction with the Michael P. Anderson Memorial Aerospace Program, named after the Washington native astronaut who died in the space shuttle Columbia tragedy. The program brings in mentors for at-risk students and gives them exposure to aerospace education, improving their chances to graduate from high school.

The talk is free with admission to the museum.

Astronomy clubs meet

Three area astronomy clubs have their regular meetings scheduled this week.

The Olympic Astronomical Society gathers at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 1 in room Art 103 on the Olympic College campus in Bremerton. The club has a half-dozen interesting talks on its agenda for the evening.

Tacoma Astronomical Society will meet at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 2 in room 175 of  Thompson Hall on the campus of the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma. Popular speaker Ron Hobbs, a NASA JPL Solar System Ambassador, will give a talk about the DAWN mission to Ceres.

The Spokane Astronomical Society plans its monthly meeting for 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 5 in the planetarium at Spokane Falls Community College. Guest speaker and program information hadn’t been published as of this writing.

First Friday Sky Walk

Pacific PlanetariumIf you haven’t checked out Pacific Planetarium in Bremerton, this Friday would be a good time to do so. The planetarium presents a First Friday Sky Walk each month, with the next being on Feb. 5. These family-friendly presentations give a look at what’s up in the night sky for the coming month. The first show is at 5 p.m. and it is repeated hourly through 8 p.m. Before or after shows you can explore the planetarium’s space science exhibits and activities. Volunteers from the Olympic Astronomical Society will be present to answer your astronomy questions.

Tickets are $3 and are available online or at the door. For those coming from the east side of the sound, the planetarium is less than a mile from the Bremerton ferry terminal.

Up in the sky

The Moon passes near Mars, Saturn, and Venus this week as the early-morning lineup of planets continues. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope have other observing highlights for the week.

Follow the Seattle Astronomy calendar to keep up to date on astronomy happenings in the area.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+EvernoteShare

Top five Seattle Astronomy stories of 2015

Happy New Year from Seattle Astronomy! We celebrate the last day of 2015 by looking back on our top five stories of the year, in chronological order.

AAS meets in Seattle

Tegmark

MIT physicist Max Tegmark speaks at the American Astronomical Society meeting Jan. 7 in Seattle.

The American Astronomical Society held its 225th meeting in Seattle in January. The AAS has been on a cycle of holding its winter meeting in town every four years, though there was talk in January of breaking that up and holding a summer meeting here so that visiting astronomers could enjoy our good weather.

The meeting included a wide variety of presentations. Among the ones we covered on Seattle Astronomy:

Astronomy on Tap Seattle

aotlogoThe organizers of Astronomy on Tap have correctly concluded that astronomy is even better with beer. A group of astronomers in New York City created Astronomy on Tap there in early 2013, and a Seattle chapter got to work beginning in March of this year. Led by a group of astronomy graduate students from the University of Washington, they’ve hosted free gatherings at Bad Jimmy’s Brewing Company in Ballard every month since. The concept is simple: meet at a bar, have brief and informal presentations about the latest in astronomy, leave plenty of time for Q&A, and have trivia contests and prizes. It’s been so popular that Bad Jimmy’s even named a beer in honor of AoT; their new Scotch Ale is “The Big Sipper.”

AoT is a lot of fun and creates monthly topics for those who blog about astronomy. Follow our calendar, or follow AoT Seattle on Facebook or Twitter to keep in the know.

Cloud Break Optics

Cloud Break OpticsIt’s been a long time since there was an astronomy store run by and for amateur astronomers in Seattle. The drought ended in July when local astronomers Matt Dahl and Stephanie Anderson opened Cloud Break Optics in Ballard. Dahl and Anderson are experienced observers and astrophotographers with plenty of experience to share and a hands-on buying experience to offer. They sell on-line, too, but why not stop by and make some new friends and share in their expert advice?

Fiftieth anniversary of the UW Department of Astronomy

bigbangThis year was a big one for anniversaries: we celebrated 25 years of the Hubble Space Telescope, 50 years since the discovery of the cosmic microwave background, and 100 years since Einstein published his theory of relativity. It turns out the biggest bash of all locally was the 50th anniversary of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Washington.

The milestone was marked by a series of public events, kicked off by a lecture by renowned physicist Jim Peebles, who talked about what it was like to be on the front lines of figuring out the cosmic microwave background. The Big Bang and Beyond lecture series covered a lot of ground, and featured a guest lecture by alum and NPR commentator Adam Frank. The Origins: Life and the Universe astrobio concert married art and science in an engaging and beautiful way. If you missed the show a CD and DVD are available. We can’t wait to see what the next 50 years bring!

Apollo F-1 engines come to Seattle

Bezos injector

Bezos talks about the workings of the F-1 injector plate. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos went on a quixotic quest to find the Rocketdyne F-1 engines that launched Apollo to the Moon. He found some on the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean and fished them out in 2013. Last month the historic engines arrived in Seattle, donated to the Museum of Flight.

Bezos was on hand to talk about the recovery mission and unveil the engine parts. A few of the components will be on display at the museum through next Monday, Jan. 4. After that they’ll be in the museum archives until late 2016 or early 2017, when a new, permanent exhibit about the engines and Apollo will be installed.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+EvernoteShare

Museum of Flight receives F-1 engines that launched Apollo

Forty-six years ago today Apollo 12 became the second craft to land people on the Moon. Today the Museum of Flight received an incredible treasure: parts of the Rocketdyne F-1 engines that blasted Apollo into orbit.

Doug King, president of the Museum of Flight, announces the gift of the Apollo F-1 engines at a news conference Nov. 19, 2015. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

Doug King, president of the Museum of Flight, announces the gift of the Apollo F-1 engines at a news conference Nov. 19, 2015. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

The engines were found at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean in 2013 by Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos and his team from Bezos Expeditions. Bezos requested that the engines be donated to the museum and NASA honored that request.

“This is truly a historic day for the museum, for our community,” said Doug King, president and CEO of the Museum of Flight. “I don’t think it’s too grandiose to say for our country and maybe even for humankind.”

“Exhibiting these historic engines not only shares NASA’s storied history, it also helps America educate to innovate,” said NASA administrator Charles Bolden in a news release. “This display of spaceflight greatness can help inspire our next generation of scientists, technologists, engineers and explorers to build upon past successes and create the new knowledge and capabilities needed to enable our journey to Mars.”

Bezos said he became interested in science and exploration as a five-year-old watching Neil Armstrong’s first small step on the Moon.

“You don’t choose your passions; your passions choose you,” he said. Bezos said he thinks about rockets at lot, and one day it occurred to him that it would be great to find and restore those F-1 engines. The engineers who built them were working to send people to the Moon, and few folks at the time were thinking about posterity.

Expendable stuff

“That first stage with these gigantic engines is expendable; it’s supposed to crash into the ocean, that was the whole plan,” Bezos said.

Jeff Bezos

Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos talks about his passion for space and the project to recover the F-1 engines. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

“We’re working on changing that plan,” he continued. “I have this space company called Blue Origin; we’re trying to make reusable rockets because we don’t like throwing the hardware away.”

It took Bezos all of ten minutes of Internet searching to find the coordinates at which NASA said the Apollo 11 first stage rocket crashed. The hunt was on.

“That was going to prove to be the only easy thing about this project,” Bezos laughed. It was an incredibly complicated endeavor. Bezos Expeditions put together a team of more than 60 people who are experts in ocean recovery. They searched some 300 square miles of ocean with side-scanning sonar to find the engines and then pulled them out from under 14,000 feet of seawater, where they’d been at rest for more than 40 years.

The parts were restored at the Kansas Cosmosphere in Hutchinson, Kansas. Much of the damage to the engines was caused not by their high-speed crash into the sea, but by silt and corrosion from four decades in salt water, though the large and highly recognizable bell-shaped nozzle extensions were badly mangled.

Great museum pieces

Geoff Nunn, the adjunct curator for space history at the museum, said the engines that drove Apollo were marvels of engineering.

Geoff Nunn

Geoff Nunn, adjunct curator for space history at the Museum of Flight, talked about what makes the F-1 engines a special artifact. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

“The Rocketdyne F-1 was the largest single-chambered liquid-fueled rocket ever flown,” Nunn said. “Each engine produced over a million and a half pounds of thrust and stood 18 and a half feet tall.”

That’s quite a kick. King said all of the planes in the museum’s entire collection collectively have only half that much thrust. Five F-1s launched each Saturn V.

The first piece unwrapped at the news conference this morning, still in its shrink wrap from Cosmosphere, was an injector plate from one of the Apollo 12 engines.

“The injector plate is really what is key to making the F-1 engine an engine and not just a million and a half pounds of bomb,” Nunn explained. “It’s covered in these minute holes that release fuel and oxidizer in an incredibly precise mixture in order to ensure that the combustion that occurs is smooth and controlled.”

Bezos injector

Bezos talks about the workings of the F-1 engine injector plate. Photo: Greg Scheiderer

Some of the F-1 engine components will go on public display at the museum starting Saturday and will be out until early January. The full collection will be part of a new, permanent exhibit that will open late next year or in early 2017.

For Bezos, finding and restoring artifacts like the F-1 engines is not about looking to the past.

“It’s about today and it’s about the future,” he said. “It’s about building a 21st-century version of the F-1 engine. It’s about building reusable rockets.

“Civilization for many centuries has been getting better and better, and the point of recovering an object like this is to remind us of who we are and what we can do as we move forward as a civilization.”

The video below from Bezos Expeditions tells the tale of the recovery of the F-1 engines from the briny Atlantic.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+EvernoteShare

Astro happenings every night this week

There’s plenty to do in Seattle this week for those interested in astronomy, as there is at least one event every evening through Saturday.

Physics week at Town Hall

Town Hall Seattle will welcome two authors to the city this week. Harvard particle physicist Lisa Randall will speak at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 2, about her new book, Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs: The Astounding Interconnectedness of the Universe (Ecco, 2015). Did dark matter kill the dinosaurs? Randall draws a connection between the Milky Way and the dislodged comet that smashed into Earth 66 million years ago. She’ll describe the ins and outs of this idea, explain what historical galactic events have to say about the present, and, perhaps most importantly, instill a greater appreciation for the interconnectedness of the universe we live in. Tickets, $5, here.

Town Hall will feature more physics on Tuesday, Nov. 3, as journalist George Musser of Scientific American talks about his new book, Spooky Action at a Distance: The Phenomenon That Reimagines Space and Time—and What It Means for Black Holes, the Big Bang, and Theories of Everything (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2015). The title is a nod to Einstein’s critique of quantum mechanics, and Musser will look at the universe, black holes, the Big Bang, wormholes, and other somewhat unknown areas of physics. In this month, which marks the centennial of the publication of Einstein’s theory of relativity, he will celebrate today’s best scientific thinking and help us understand it. Musser’s talk will begin at 7:30. Tickets are $5 here.

UW astro anniversary celebration continues

Morales

Morales

The University of Washington Alumni Association is helping to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the university’s Department of Astronomy with a series of four lectures titled The Big Bang and Beyond: Four Excursions to the Edges of Time and Space. The second in the series will be held Wednesday, Nov. 4 at 7:30 p.m. in room 120 of Kane Hall on the UW campus in Seattle. UW professor Miguel Morales will give a talk titled “The End of the Beginning,” focusing on how scientists read the subtle patterns in the cosmic microwave background to infer what happened in the first few moments of our universe’s history.

All of the free tickets for this lecture, and for the others in the Big Bang and Beyond series, have been claimed. It may be possible to gain admission on a waiting list should there be no-shows. Check our previous post for a rundown of other anniversary events.

Spacefest comes to Museum of Flight

spacefestlogoThe Museum of Flight will host a three-day Spacefest beginning Thursday, Nov. 5 and running through Saturday the seventh. Highlights of the event include astronaut John Herrington leading a glider-building session during the museum’s free-admission evening on Thursday, discussions Friday about the rigors of human spaceflight, and a look Saturday at the challenges of a trip to Mars.

Visit the museum website for a full schedule of the three-day festival.

Origins

originsposterThe centerpiece of the UW astronomy anniversary celebration is a multimedia concert, Origins: Life and the Universe, at 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 7 at Benaroya Hall in downtown Seattle. Eight Seattle composers have created original orchestral music that showcases the complexity and beauty of our universe. The symphonic concert will be accompanied by projected high-resolution movies created using some of the most spectacular imagery, videos and conceptual art from the Hubble Space Telescope and a variety of other sources. The live concert will feature Grammy-award winning conductor David Sabee and the renowned Northwest Sinfonia orchestra.

Check our previous previews of pieces of the concert, with composers Nan Avant and Glenna Burmer.

The concert is a benefit for scholarships in the UW Department of Astronomy and Astrobiology program. Tickets are $32, $22 for students, and are available through the Seattle Symphony website.

TAS and spectroscopy

The Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold one of its public nights beginning at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 7 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The night will feature a presentation about spectroscopy. In addition, club members will have telescopes on hand should weather conditions be favorable for observing the heavens.

Don’t forget to look up

Venus, Jupiter, Mars, and the Moon are holding a little dance during the mornings all week. Check them out high in the southeast before dawn. The Taurid meteor shower peaks on Nov. 5, but watch out for a few days before and after as well. EarthSky has a good article about watching the Taurids, and Astronomy magazine’s The Sky This Week has daily observing highlights.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+EvernoteShare

Science and art meet in planetary nebulae

The next time someone tells you that science and art don’t mix, point them to the work of the Hubble Space Telescope. Hubble images are the inspiration for a multimedia concert, “Origins: Life and the Universe,” coming up at 2 p.m. November 7 at Benaroya Hall in Seattle. Astronomer Bruce Balick and composer Nan Avant explained during a talk last week at the Museum of Flight how one segment of the concert was created.

Balick

Prof. Bruce Balick, in front of a slide depicting Galileo, talks about science and art at the Museum of Flight. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

Balick, professor emeritus in the Department of Astronomy at the University of Washington, noted that science is, to a great extent, the result of our unique human ability to recognize patterns.

“Science is observing the world around us and describing the pattern, typically with mathematical forumlas,” Balick said. “After that we puzzle over what these patterns might mean. We use the patterns as a means to gain insight into the way in which the natural world works.”

While Balick has spent his career studying planetary nebulae, he also loves the incredible images of those celestial objects that Hubble has returned to Earth.

“I want you to appreciate what I hope Nan has found in these pictures, namely glorious natural patterns that inspire music,” he said. “These objects are simply beautiful.”

Nan Avant

Composer Nan Avant gestures while talking about her creative process on “Bijoux.” Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

Avant, a composer from Ballard, said the photos spoke to her.

“I was so inspired by what I’d seen with these brilliant colorful images,” she said. In addition, she was influenced by conversations with Balick about the Orion Nebula and the Carina Nebula, the two objects that are featured in her multimedia composition, “Bijoux.”

“There’s so much going on in the nebula I wanted to continue this into my concept of the music, so I created many themes or melodies to represent the nebula,” Avant explained.

Avant said her last year, working on the project, has been “astounding.”

“As a composer, I’ve learned about the nebula, the universe. I had conversations with a distinguished scientist of the nebula. I collaborated with a filmmaker,” she said. “And finally, I composed an orchestral work about the universe. I grew so much as an artist, a composer, and an orchestrator.”

The title of the piece, “Bijoux,” is French for “jewels.”

“When I was looking through these breathtaking, stunning images and the music was unfolding into rich melodies and textures, I wanted to find a word, just one word, that expressed the music and images all in one idea,” Avant said of the choice.

originsposter“Scientists, musicians, artists, all of them have so much in common,” Balick marveled. “We love pattern. We appreciate pattern. Pattern says something to us. It may be visceral, it may be scientific. It comes in the form of music, it comes in the form of art.”

The “Origins” concert is part of the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Department of Astronomy at the UW. The concert will feature the work of eight composers and accompanying celestial photography. It is a benefit for the scholarship program at the University of Washington Astrobiology Program in the Department of Astronomy. Tickets are $32, $22 for students, and are available online or by calling the Benaroya Hall ticket office at 206-215-4747.

Another chance to preview one of the pieces in the concert is coming up at 2 p.m. next Saturday, Oct. 17, at the Museum of Flight. Professor Matt McQuinn of the UW Department of Astronomy will take a close look at how our universe was formed and how small fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background grow into galaxies with stars and planets. Glenna Burmer, who composed a piece entitled “The Big Bang,” will discuss her musical and visual interpretation of the 13.8-billion-year history of our universe, exploring the process that composers and filmmakers use to bridge science and art. The talk, titled “Origin of the Universe and Everything in It,” is free with museum admission.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+EvernoteShare

UW astro anniversary events highlight week’s calendar

The celebration of the 50th anniversary of the University of Washington Department of Astronomy goes into full swing with a couple of interesting lectures this week.

Space Tourism

CharlesSimonyiMediaPhoto

Dr. Charles Simonyi

Space traveler, philanthropist, and high-tech pioneer Dr. Charles Simonyi will give a talk titled “Practicalities of Orbital Space Tourism” at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 29 in room 120 of Kane Hall on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. Simonyi will discuss his experiences with orbital spaceflight in 2007 and 2009 and what this portends for future orbital space tourism. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

Origins of nebulae

Balick

UW Prof. Bruce Balick speaking prior to a talk by James Peebles at the UW in May. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

Astronomy Day was officially Sept. 19, but the Museum of Flight continues the observance this Thursday, Oct. 1. One of the evening’s events will be “Star Formation and Nebulae as Cosmic Science and Song.” UW astronomy professor Bruce Balick will give a talk about the origins of nebulae, followed by a preview of Nan Avant‘s multimedia composition “Bijoux” which showcases some of the more spectacular nebulae ever discovered. Both will be held starting at 6 p.m. in the Charles Simonyi Space Gallery at the museum. The event is a preview of the UW Department of Astronomy’s multimedia Origins concert coming up on Nov. 7.

In addition, local science and astronomy clubs will be at the museum Oct. 1 to share their knowledge of the heavens, and will offer views of the evening sky through their telescopes, weather permitting. Visitors also will be able to marvel at the wonders of the night sky in the museum’s portable planetarium. All events are free, part of the museum’s free first Thursday program from 5 p.m. until 9 p.m.

TAS and cosmic collisions

The Tacoma Astronomical Society holds one of its public nights at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 3 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. Society members will give a presentation about “Cosmic Collisions,” and they will have telescopes on hand for observing if the weather cooperates.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+EvernoteShare

Total lunar eclipse, Astronomy Day, Journey to Mars highlight week’s activity

A total lunar eclipse, a big birthday party, and a journey to Mars highlight the next 10 days on the Seattle Astronomy calendar.

Eclipse of the Moon

IMG_1022

The Moon in August, 2010. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

Europe and the Americas will be treated to a total lunar eclipse on Sunday, Sept. 27. For us on the U.S. west coast, the Moon will be partially eclipsed when it rises just before 7 p.m., and we’ll see the start of the total eclipse at about 7:11. Totality will last an hour and 12 minutes, and the Moon will begin to emerge from Earth’s shadow at 8:23 p.m. The partial eclipse will end at 9:27 p.m.

Sky & Telescope magazine has a good article about the eclipse, and also check their Sky at a Glance feature for other observing highlights for the week.

Happy Birthday MOF

50_MoF _blue_finalThe Museum of Flight is celebrating its 50th birthday this year, and one of the main events of the observance will be a gala party at the museum on Saturday, Sept. 19. Admission to the museum will be just 50 cents that day—the original price in 1965—and the day’s activities will include a 50th anniversary scavenger hunt, 60s throwback costume contest, a paper plane workshop, mini-missions in the Challenger Learning Center, and fun surprises and giveaways.

Journey to Mars

marssThe Museum of Flight will host the traveling NASA exhibit “Journey to Mars” for one week only, Sept. 22-27. The interactive exhibit looks at NASA’s current robotic expeditions to the Red Planet, and how humans will someday set foot on Martian soil. The week’s events also will include visits from astronauts Mike Barratt and Jeannette Epps.

The Museum will host two public discussions on Thursday, Sept. 24. At 1:30 p.m. Barratt and several others will talk about the life support, habitat, materials, and propulsion needs for a human mission to Mars. Then at 3 p.m. Boeing Company historian Mike Lombardi and Chris Crumbly of NASA Space Launch System Office will talk about the lessons learned from Apollo that will inform a future mission to Mars.

Epps will meet with museum visitors from 10 a.m. until noon on Saturday, Sept. 26.

Check the museum’s website for a full schedule of events for the week.

Star parties on Astronomy Day

astronomydaySaturday, Sept. 19 is Astronomy Day, and two area astronomy clubs will host public star parties on that date.

The Seattle Astronomical Society will host its free monthly star parties at Green Lake in Seattle and Paramount Park in Shoreline. Both events begin at 7 p.m., weather permitting. The Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold one of its public nights beginning at 9 p.m. at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. An indoor presentation will cover “The Reason for the Seasons,” and telescopes will be available for observing if the skies are clear.

Astronomy on Tap

aot7Astronomy on Tap Seattle will hold its monthly confab at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 23 at Bad Jimmy’s Brewing Company in Ballard. Hosted by graduate students in astronomy from the University of Washington, AoT features beer, trivia contests, cupcakes, and quick talks about the cosmos. This week’s speakers will be Dr. Breanna Binder, who will discuss “Sibling Rivarly in Giant Stars” (no doubt a reprise of a lecture given in August to the Seattle Astronomical Society) and Pheobe Upton Sanderbeck, who will cover “Taking the Temperature of the Universe.”

Astronomy on Tap is free, but please register here.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+EvernoteShare