Tag Archives: Museum of Flight

SpaceFest at MOF tops week’s astro calendar

A three-day space fest, several star parties, some astronomy club meetings, and a chance to meet Viking mission folks are on tab for the next week of astronomy events.

SpaceFest: Ladies who LaunchThe third annual SpaceFest at the Museum of Flight kicks off Thursday for three days of exhibits and presentations. Under the theme of Ladies Who Launch, this year’s SpaceFest celebrates women astronauts, engineers, authors, and others who helped put America into space.

The days are packed with events. Highlights include a talk by South Korean Astronaut Soyeon Yi at 1 p.m. Friday, November 4, and a keynote at 2:15 p.m. Saturday, November 5 by Nathalia Holt, author of Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us, from Missiles to the Moon to Mars (Little, Brown and Company, 2016). The book is a tale of young women who, with only pencil, paper, and mathematical prowess, transformed rocket design, helped bring about the first American satellites, and made the exploration of the solar system possible.

You can order the book by clicking the link above; purchases through the Seattle Astronomy Store help defray our operating costs and enable us to bring you great astronomy stories. Check the full schedule for the weekend on the museum’s online calendar. We plan to attend a number of the sessions, and will report back!

Viking at Portland Science Pub

VMMEPPMeet some of the folks involved with the Viking Mars missions in the mid-1970s at Science Pub Portland at 7 p.m. Thursday, November 3 at McMenamins Mission Theater in Portland. As an 11-year-old girl Rachel Tillman saved the last remaining un-flown Viking spacecraft from the scrap heap. She later became founder and is executive director of the nonprofit organization The Viking Mars Missions Education & Preservation Project. Tillman will speak at Science Pub Portland, along with Al Treder, who worked on Viking guidance and control; Pat DeMartine, Viking lander command sequence and simulation programmer and science team member; and Peggy Newcomb, wife of NASA Viking engineer and author John Newcomb, who passed away in March.

Suggested donation for admission is $5. Science Pub Portland is a program of the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry. If you can’t make this Viking Mars Mission event, it will be repeated at Science Pub Eugene on November 10 and Science Pub Corvallis on the 14th.

Saving the planet

Ed Lu

Ed Lu. Photo: NASA

When the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope comes online, it is expected that the discovery rate of near-Earth asteroids will increase by more than a factor of 20 over the current rate, and that the list of asteroids with a worrisome probability of hitting the Earth will also become much larger. Astronaut Ed Lu, CEO and co-founder of the B612 Foundation, will discuss the scientific as well as public policy challenges related to potential asteroid impact scenarios at this week’s University of Washington astronomy colloquium. The event will be held at 4 p.m. Thursday, November 3 in the Physics/Astronomy Auditorium on the UW campus in Seattle.

Club meetings

The Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, November 1 in room 175 of Thompson Hall on the University of Puget Sound campus in Tacoma. Topics will include a review of some of the club’s new gear and a primer on Proxima b, a roughly Earth-sized planet believed to be in orbit around our nearest stellar neighbor.

The Spokane Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Friday, November 4 at the planetarium at Spokane Falls Community College. Specific topics or guest speakers for the gathering had not been published as of this writing.

Star parties

There are three star parties on the calendar for this week. The Covington Community Park Star Party is planned for 8 p.m. Friday, November 4 at the park. The event is a joint effort of the Seattle Astronomical Society and the Boeing Employees’ Astronomical Society.

The Seattle club also plans its free monthly public star parties for 6 p.m. Saturday, November 5 at two locations: Green Lake in Seattle and Paramount Park in Shoreline. Cloudy weather will mean cancellation of the star parties; watch the club’s website or social media for updates.

Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold one of its free public nights at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, November 5 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The indoor program will be about spectroscopy. If the weather is clear they’ll break out the telescopes and have a look at what’s up in the night sky.

Futures file

You can scout out future astronomy events on our calendar. New additions to the calendar this week include:

Up in the sky

The Taurid meteor shower peaks this Thursday and Friday. This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope magazine and The Sky This Week from Astronomy have more observing highlights for the week.

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Get the scoop on SpaceShipOne

A lesson on how to make a spaceship and several astronomy club events highlight the local calendar for the coming week.

Road to SpaceShipOne

Meet the principals in XPRIZE-winning SpaceShipOne project at 5:30 p.m. Monday, October 17 at the Museum of Flight. Author Julian Guthrie will discuss her book about the XPRIZE competition, How to Make a Spaceship: A Band of Renegades, an Epic Race, and the Birth of Private Spaceflight (Penguin Press, 2016). Three of the renegades will join her as Geekwire science correspondent Alan Boyle moderates a panel discussion including XPRIZE founder Peter Diamandis, co-founder Erik Lindbergh, and Dave Moore, project manager for Paul Allen on the XPRIZE-winning SpaceShipOne.

The evening will include a meet-and-greet reception from 5:30 until 6:30, Guthrie’s presentation at 6:30, the panel discussion at 6:45, and a question-and-answer session and book signing from 7:30 until 8:30. Cost is $10 and tickets are available online.

You can pick up a copy of the book at the link above or by clicking the image of the book cover.

Astro club events

Michael BarrattThe Rose City Astronomers will hold their monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Monday, October 17 at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry in Portland. The guest speaker will be astronaut Michael Barratt, who spent 199 days in space as flight engineer for International Space Station expeditions 19 and 20 in 2009 and also flew on STS-133, the final flight of the shuttle Discovery, in 2011. Barratt is a native of the Portland area.

The Eastside Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday, October 18 in the Willard Geer Planetarium at Bellevue College. Patti Terhune-Inverso, an astronomy instructor at the college and a member of Eastside Astronomical Society, will present the introduction to the constellations that she uses for her classes at the beginning of each quarter.

The Seattle Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, October 19 in room A102 of the Physics/Astronomy building on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. The program had not been published as of this writing.

Astronomy in Pierce County Saturday

Pierce College will host a couple of events at its Fort Steilacoom campus on Saturday, October 22.

haunted-night-skySpook-tober continues at the Pierce College Science Dome, which will be presenting a kids’ show called “Haunted Night Sky” on Saturdays through Halloween. Participants will be able to find creatures in the night sky, build a Frankenstein satellite, and take a tour of the Sea of Serpents on the Moon, the Witch’s Head Nebula, and other spooky places in the universe. Best for kids ages 3-12. Shows are scheduled for 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. each Saturday. Cost is $3.

The Tacoma Astronomical Society plans one of its public nights for Saturday evening at 7:30. The indoor program will be a Halloween special. They’ll break out the telescopes for observing if the weather cooperates.

Futures file

You can scout out future astronomy events on our calendar. New additions to the calendar this week include a talk by astrophysicist Priyamvada Natarajan at Town Hall Seattle November 14. Natarajan will talk about her new book, Mapping the Heavens: The Radical Scientific Ideas That Reveal the Cosmos (Yale University Press, 2016). Tickets are $5 and are available online.

Up in the sky

The Orionid meteor shower peaks this Friday and Saturday. Learn about the showers and other observing highlights for the week by visiting This Week’s Sky at a Glance by Sky & Telescope magazine and The Sky This Week by Astronomy.

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Astronaut visit a hot ticket this week

An astronaut visit to Seattle is the highlight of this week’s area astronomy calendar, but if you don’t have a ticket already you may be out of luck.

Spaceman: An Evening With Astronaut Mike Massimino will be happening at 5:30 p.m. Friday, October 14 at the Museum of Flight, but as of this writing the event is sold out. The evening’s events include a reception, lecture, and signing of Massimino’s new book Spaceman: An Astronaut’s Unlikely Journey to Unlock the Secrets of the Universe (Crown Archetype, 2016). Massimino is a veteran of two space shuttle missions, including the final servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope. If you’d like to go to Friday’s event, you might watch the museum’s website in case additional tickets become available or a waiting list is established. You can pick up the book, at least, at the link above or by clicking the photo at left.

The Boeing Employees’ Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting Thursday, October 13, with social time starting at 6:30 p.m. and the evening program beginning at 7 p.m. The meeting will be held in the Boeing “Oxbow” Recreation Center, Building 9-150, Room 201. Non-Boeing attendees are welcome but will need an escort; visit the website for details.

haunted-night-skyIt’s Spook-tober at the Pierce College Science Dome, which will be presenting a kids’ show called “Haunted Night Sky” on Saturdays through Halloween. Participants will be able to find creatures in the night sky, build a Frankenstein satellite, and take a tour of the Sea of Serpents on the Moon, the Witch’s Head Nebula, and other spooky places in the universe. Best for kids ages 3-12. Shows are scheduled for 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. each Saturday. Cost is $3.

Futures file

You can scout out future astronomy events on our calendar. New additions to the calendar this week include:

Up in the sky

Eagle-eyed early birds can spot Mercury and Jupiter together in the east just before dawn on October 11. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope have more observing highlights for the week.

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Four star parties, three astro club meetings this week

It’s a busy week for local astronomy clubs, which have meetings and star parties galore on the docket as we roll into October.

Astronomy clubs

Olympic Astronomical SocietyOlympic Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Monday, October 3 in room Art 103 at Olympic College in Bremerton. Presentations will include a look back at the New Horizons mission and a recap of the club’s recent Camp Delaney Star Party.

Tacoma Astronomical Society plans its monthly meeting for 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, October 4 in room 175 on the campus of the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma. Discussion topics had not been posted as of this writing.

The Spokane Astronomical Society will meet at 7:30 p.m. Friday, October 7 in the Planetarium at Spokane Falls Community College. Guest speaker Sukanta Bose, a member of the physics and astronomy faculty at Washington State University, will discuss the first direct detection of gravitational waves, and how the discovery is changing astronomy.

Astronomy night at MOF

MOFThe Museum of Flight will celebrate Astronomy Night as part of its free first Thursday event beginning at 5 p.m. October 6. The evening’s activities will include programs and family activities that tour the galaxies. Local science and astronomy clubs will be on hand to share their knowledge of the heavens and views through their telescopes. Celestial wonders will shine in the museum’s portable planetarium, and NASA JPL Solar System Ambassador Tony Gondola will give a special presentation at 7 pm.

Star parties

There are three star parties on the calendar for this week. The Covington Community Park Star Party is set for Friday, October 7. It’s a cooperative venture between the Boeing Employees Astronomical Society, Seattle Astronomical Society, and Tacoma Astronomical Society. We note a little confusion about the start time, as the SAS website has it at 8 p.m. and BEAS lists 7 p.m.

Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold one of its free public nights at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, October 8 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The indoor program will be the movie Cosmic Collisions. If the weather cooperates club members will have telescopes out for observing.

The Seattle Astronomical Society’s free public star parties are set for 7 p.m. Saturday, October 8 at two locations: Green Lake in Seattle and Paramount Park in Shoreline. Bad weather cancels these events so watch the club’s website or social media for updates.

Up in the sky

Watch for the Moon near Venus during twilight on Monday and near Saturn on Wednesday evening. This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope magazine and The Sky This Week from Astronomy have more observing highlights for the week.

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Labor Day week astronomy events

Happy Labor Day to all! There’s a little something on the astronomy calendar just about every night this week.

Focus on astrophotography

Tacoma Astronomical SocietyThe Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, September 7 in room 175 of Thompson Hall on the University of Puget Sound campus in Tacoma. The meeting topic will be DSLR photography, with four experienced shooters and two beginners sharing their tips and challenges. The club hopes to spur wider interest in the pursuit of astrophotography.

TAS will also hold one of its public nights beginning at 9 p.m. Saturday, September 10 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The indoor program will be about the Hubble Space Telescope. Club members will be on hand with scopes for public viewing, weather permitting.

Last month for Jacobsen open houses

Theodor Jacobsen ObservatoryThe second-to-last open house of the season at the University of Washington’s Theodor Jacobsen Observatory will be held at 8 p.m. Wednesday, September 7. Recent physics and astronomy graduate Evan Davis will give a talk about exoplanets. With the recent strong evidence of a planet orbiting the nearest star, Proxima Centauri, Davis’s talk is especially relevant! Reservations are recommended.

After the September 21 open house, the outreach program will go on hiatus until March.

Astronomy clubs

beaslogo_300The Boeing Employees Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, September 8 at the Boeing “Oxbow” Recreation center. The topic or guest speaker was yet to be announced as of this writing. Non-Boeing guests are welcome, but should RSVP to Dave Ingram, contact info on the meeting link above.

Spokane Astronomical SocietyThe Spokane Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Friday, September 9 at the Riverview Retirement Community in Spokane. The guest speaker will be Don Peckham, a member of Rose City Astronomers who has been assistant director of the club’s telescope workshop since 2005. Peckham created the String Telescope Concepts and the Tensegrity String Telescope websites. He has designed and built two truss-tube telescopes, two traditional string telescopes, and three tensegrity string telescopes.

BPAA logoSaturday will be a busy night on Bainbridge Island as the Battle Point Astronomical Association holds several events. Its BP Astro Kids programs at 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. September 10 will look at comets and help kids make their own. The planetarium program at 7:30 p.m. will take a look at cool Hubble Space Telescope images you may have missed. Observing will happen, weather permitting.

Seattle Astronomical SocietyThe Seattle Astronomical Society will hold its monthly free public star parties at 8 p.m. Saturday, September 10 at two locations: Green Lake in Seattle and Paramount Park in Shoreline. The star parties are cancelled in the event of weather unfavorable for astronomical observing. Watch the SAS website for the latest.

Above and Beyond closes

MOFIt’s your last week to check out the special exhibit Above and Beyond at the Museum of Flight. The interactive traveling exhibit celebrates both the history and future of flight through a variety of immersive simulations, interactive design challenges, impactful stories of innovation, and more. This large-scale exhibition invites you to experience what it takes to make the “impossible” possible. The last day to experience it is September 10. It’s free with museum admission.

Futures file

You can scout out future astronomy events on our calendar. New additions this week include:

  • Astronaut Mike Massimino will speak at the Museum of Flight October 14
  • Author Julian Guthrie and others will talk about the Road to SpaceShipOne at the Museum of Flight October 17
  • Physicist Rainer Weiss, a key figure in gravitational wave research, will lecture at the University of Washington October 25

Up in the sky

Spot the Moon near Saturn Thursday and Mars Friday. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope have more observing highlights for the week.

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A look at a nearby exoplanet tops the week’s calendar

We’re back from a couple of weeks of travel and find a busy calendar of events for the week ahead.

Barnes

UW Prof. Rory Barnes at an Astronomy on Tap event in January. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

If you missed last week’s Astronomy on Tap Seattle event—as we did because we were out of town—then you missed getting some first-hand information from Rory Barnes, Professor of Astronomy and Astrobiology at the University of Washington, about the newly discovered exoplanet in orbit around our nearest stellar neighbor. Fear not: Barnes will give a lecture titled, “Opportunities and Obstacles for Life on Proxima Centauri B” at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, August 31 at the PACCAR IMAX® Theater at the Pacific Science Center. Barnes will discuss how this Earth-sized planet was discovered, and how we’ll go about figuring out whether it’s habitable and inhabited. Tickets to the talk are $5 and are available online. It’s free for PacSci members.

Learn about telescopes

MOFTake a look through telescopes at the Free First Thursday event at the Museum of Flight from 5 p.m. until 9 p.m. September 1. The evening will include family activities and exhibits about telescopes, and NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador Tony Gondola will give a presentation titled “The History of Telescopes and How They Work” at 7 p.m. in the museum’s Fluke Challenger Learning Center.

While you’re out at the Museum of Flight check out the special exhibit Above and Beyond, which celebrates both the history and future of flight through a variety of immersive simulations, interactive design challenges, impactful stories of innovation, and more. Your opportunities are running out; the exhibit closes September 10.

Star Parties

As we turn the calendar to September star party season starts to wind down. There are several on the docket for this week.

Seattle Astronomical SocietyThe Seattle Astronomical Society will hold a star party at the super-dark Brooks Memorial State Park near Goldendale from September 1-5. Closer to home, the club will hold a star party beginning at 9 p.m. Saturday, September 3 at the Rattlesnake Mountain Trailhead. Note that both of these events are for SAS members only; one of many good reasons to join now!

Olympic Astronomical Society will hold one of its Hurricane Ridge Star Parties Saturday, September 3. The event is free save for admission to Olympic National Park.

Oregon ObservatoryThe Brothers Star Party, a fundraiser for the Oregon Observatory at Sunriver, will be held August 31-September 5 near the town of Brothers, east of Bend, Oregon. Formerly held at Mount Bachelor, this star party has been at the new site near Brothers for several years, and the location gets high marks for dark skies. Find registration info, directions, and more details on the BSP Facebook page or website. Onsite registration is available.

Up in the sky

There’s a new Moon on Thursday, which means observing will be at its best, and Neptune reaches opposition on Friday; see if you can spot the most distant confirmed planet. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope have more observing highlights for the week.

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AstronoMay kicks off at PacSci

Pacific Science CenterWhy settle for one astronomy day when you can have AstronoMay? Astronomy Day is May 14, but the Pacific Science Center has the whole month packed with astronomy activities. The first is coming up at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, May 5 in the center’s Willard Smith Planetarium, which will hook up with the Adler Planetarium and others around the country for an interactive, networked lecture, “From The Big Bang To The Multiverse And Beyond.” The talk will be given by Dr. Michael Turner of the University of Chicago, a noted cosmologist credited with coining the term dark energy. Turner will delve into what we know and also tackle some of the mysteries and puzzles of cosmology today.

Other lectures planned for AstronoMay:

  • Elena Amador, a UW graduate student in Earth and Space Sciences, presents, “Search for Water on Mars” May 14 at 10 a.m.
  • Dr. Sandeep Singh, planetary scientist at the Bear Fight Institute, presents “Saturn’s Hazy Moon, Titan” May 14 at 2:30 p.m.
  • Dr. Will Grundy of Lowell Observatory presents “Pluto & Charon Up-Close” May 22 at 2:15 p.m.

The lectures are free with admission to the Pacific Science Center, but tickets are required and available online.

On Saturdays during May, and on Sunday, May 22, volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society will be set up on the courtyard of the center with solar telescopes for safe viewing of the Sun. All month long there will be exhibits and hands-on activities about space and astronomy, and planetarium presentations (our calendar has the schedule) and IMAX movies, including A Beautiful Planet 3D.

AstronoMay website and calendar.

Club news

Tacoma Astronomical SocietyArea astronomy clubs are busy this week. The Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 3 in room 175 of Thompson Hall at the University of Puget Sound. There will be a presentation by Michael Laine, president of the Liftport Group, which is drawing up plans for a lunar elevator. The club will hold one of its free public nights at 9 p.m. Saturday, May 7 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The TAS student group will make a presentation about the solar system. Observing will happen if weather permits.

Spokane Astronomical SocietyThe Spokane Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 6 at the planetarium at Spokane Falls Community College. Stefanie Milam, a project scientist with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, will give a presentation on either the James Webb Space Telescope or recent discoveries of sugar and ethanol in comets. They note the latter represents all of the makings for a wild star party.

Olympic Astronomical Society will hold its 12th annual spring Camp Delaney Star Party May 4-8 out at Sun Lakes State Park near Coulee City in Eastern Washington. Club members already on site recommend industrial strength bug protection as the mosquitos are out in force. Note the preregistration was required for the event.

Supernova impostor

Brianna Binder

Breanna Binder. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

Dr. Breanna Binder of the University of Washington will give an astronomy colloquium at 4 p.m. Thursday, May 5 in the Physics/Astronomy Auditorium on the UW campus in Seattle. Binder will talk about supernova 2010da, which is not really a supernova, but an interesting object with a high-luminosity, variable X-ray emission. The X-ray emission is consistent with accretion onto a neutron star, making SN 2010da both a supernova impostor and likely high mass X-ray binary. Binder gave a talk about x-ray binary systems last August at the Seattle Astronomical Society’s monthly meeting.

Space Day at Museum of Flight

moflogoThursday is not only Cinco de Mayo, it is Space Day at the Museum of Flight. It’s part of the Museum’s free first Thursday from 5 p.m. until 9 p.m. Local astronomy clubs will be on hand with information, and telescopes for observing if weather permits.

Open House at TJO

There will be an open house at the University of Washington’s Theodor Jacobsen Observatory at 9 p.m. Wednesday, May 4. As of this writing the schedule for the events talks by undergraduate students had not been published online. Volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society will be on hand to offer observatory tours, and perhaps a peek through its vintage six-inch 1892 Warner and Swasey telescope with Brashear objective.

Up in the sky

The Eta Aquarid meteor shower peaks this week. Learn about the shower and other observing highlights for the week from This Week’s Sky at a Glance by Sky & Telescope magazine or The Sky This Week from Astronomy.

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