Tag Archives: Pacific Planetarium

Club events and planetarium shows on tap for this week

The first weekend in December is heavy with club events, star parties, and planetarium shows. Here’s what’s on the calendar for the coming week:

Club gatherings

Spokane Astronomical SocietyIn December many astronomy clubs opt out of a formal meeting and instead hold a banquet or other more social gathering. The Spokane Astronomical Society plans its annual potluck dinner for 6 p.m. Friday, December 2 at the Riverview Retirement Community. A guest speaker will follow the dinner at 7:30. Dr. John Buchanan, a professor of geology at Eastern Washington University, will talk about catastrophic outburst flooding that have occurred on Earth and Mars through geologic time. He will examine how the “Ice Age Floods” in eastern Washington compare with various large floods both on Earth and Mars.

Seattle Astronomical SocietyThe Seattle Astronomical Society plans its free monthly public star parties for 6 p.m. Saturday, December 3 at two locations: Green Lake in Seattle and Paramount Park in Shoreline. Poor weather will mean cancellation of the events, so watch the club’s website and social media for updates.

Tacoma Astronomical SocietyThe Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold one of its free public nights at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, December 3 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The all-weather program will be about selecting gift telescopes, binoculars, and other astronomy gear. (We covered that topic, too last week!) If the weather is good they’ll also put their gear into action for some celestial observing.

Planetarium shows

Planetaria have no trouble with cloudy weather! There are several shows on the docket for the week.

The University of Washington planetarium will host three free shows on Friday, December 2 at 5:30, 6:30, and 7:30 p.m. Reservations for all three times were snapped up quickly, but you can watch this site to see if tickets become available.

Pacific Planetarium in Bremerton will host its First Friday Sky Walk shows December 2, with a presentation every half-hour between 5 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. The shows look at what’s up in the sky for the coming month.

There are a variety of shows suitable for all ages every day at the Willard Smith Planetarium at the Pacific Science Center. You’ll find their complete schedule on our calendar page.

Futures file

You can scout out future astronomy events on our calendar. New additions to the calendar this week include:

Up in the sky

Venus and the Moon make a nice pairing on the evening of December 3. This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope magazine and The Sky This Week from Astronomy offer more observing highlights for the week.

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Wednesday astronomy at UW

Most of the week’s astronomy activity is focused on a couple of events Wednesday at the University of Washington.

Seattle Astronomical SocietyThe Seattle Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 15 in room A102 of the Physics/Astronomy building on the Seattle campus. Society member John McLaren will give a presentation about solar exploration, covering early human interactions with the Sun and their unexpected impacts on our growing technology. He’ll discuss how we learned about the Sun before the space age, what we’ve since discovered from space-based observing, and what the future holds for solar observations from space. The meeting is open to the public.

TJO goes retrograde

Theodor Jacobsen Observatory

Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

After the SAS gathering you’ll have just enough time to dash up campus to one of the twice-monthly open houses at the Theodor Jacobsen Observatory, which begins at 9 p.m. With both Mars and Saturn in the retrograde parts of their orbits, the observatory director, Dr. Ana Larson, will talk about what that means, will discuss the historical context, and help visitors plot the motion of Mars against the background stars using a star map.

With both planets well placed for viewing, hope for clear skies and at peek at them through the observatory’s vintage telescope, operated by volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society.

Planetaria

The Willard Smith Planetarium at Pacific Science Center has several astronomy shows every day. Check our calendar for the schedule.

Pacific Planetarium in Bremerton will offer public shows on Friday, June 17, with hourly presentations at 5 p.m., 6 p.m., and 7 p.m. The topic will be star hopping: how to explore the heavens using the constellations and stars as a guide. Admission to the shows is $5.

Up in the sky

Jupiter, Mars, and Saturn all remain well placed for evening viewing these days, but there’s plenty more to see. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope have other observing highlights for the week.

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Martians celebrate Yuri’s Night

Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first human to travel in space back on April 12, 1961, and the Yuri’s Night World Space Party marking the occasion is Tuesday. The night actually should be a week or so as various organizations mess with the calendar a little and observe Yuri’s Night when it’s most convenient locally.

The MartianIn Seattle we’re calling in the Martians to celebrate Yuri’s Night. Aditya Sood, one of the producers of the film The Martian, will speak at the Museum of Flight at 2 p.m. Saturday, April 16. Sood will discuss the making of the movie and talk about his favorite moments in the story. He’ll also attend a meet and greet reception after the talk.

The Yuri’s Night website lists scores of registered events. The only one in the state of Washington is at 5 p.m. Saturday, April 16 at Pearson Air Museum at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. The free, family-friendly activities will include the construction and launching of pressure bottle rockets and a talk about space exploration from the Oregon L5 Society. Dr. Cameron Smith will be present with his home-built high altitude pressure suit and his high altitude helium balloon, from which he intends to test his pressure suit later this year. Weather permitting, the evening will finish with an outdoor star gazing tour led by a national park ranger.

The Portland State Aerospace Society, a student aerospace group at Portland State University with decades of experience in high-powered amateur rocketry, will host a Yuri’s Night Party at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 12 in the engineering building of Portland State University. Planned events include a “space race” with challenges and games, technology displays from local rocketry and space groups, engineering labs open to visitors, and refreshments. They will also screen the film First Orbit, a reconstruction of what Yuri would have seen on his journey.

Explore Mars

Pacific PlanetariumThe third Friday planetarium shows at Pacific Planetarium in Bremerton will be held Friday, April 15 with shows at 5 p.m., 6 p.m., and 7 p.m. Explore Mars from above, below, and all around as they compare it to the other rocky planets. The folks at the planetarium just updated their website, and they’re still working some of the bugs out. For example, I’m not able to find the “buy tickets” link that they used to have. We expect you can get tickets at the door. For people coming from the east side of the sound, the planetarium is less than a mile from the Bremerton ferry dock; you could walk it and avoid the pricey ticket for your vehicle on the ferry!

Club events

saslogoThe Seattle Astronomical Society plans its free monthly public star parties for 8 p.m. Saturday, April 16 at two locations: Green Lake in Seattle and Paramount Park in Shoreline. Bad weather cancels the star parties; watch the SAS website or social media for updates.

taslogoThe Tacoma Astronomical Society will host one of its free public nights at 9 p.m. Saturday, April 16 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. There will be a presentation about space exploration, and observing if weather permits.

Up in the sky

The Moon will be near Jupiter next Sunday. This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope magazine and The Sky This Week from Astronomy have other observing highlights for the week.

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U.S.-Japan Space Forum meets this week in Seattle

Leading space policy experts from the United States and Japan will meet in Seattle this week and their public symposium is the highlight of our calendar of events.

The U.S.-Japan Space Forum is a standing committee of experts from the two countries who examine critical developments and opportunities for bilateral and multilateral space-related activities. Reflecting the increasingly important role of the private sector in national space capabilities, the forum integrates the perspectives of a wide array of experts, including corporate, academic, and other non-government players.

As part of its meeting this week the forum will present a public symposium at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday, March 16 at the Museum of Flight. The symposium will include a panel discussion about the threats and opportunities in the space industry, moderated by Prof. Saadia Pekkanen of the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington. Pekkanen is co-chair of the forum. The agenda is online.

The event is being sponsored by the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation, the Museum of Flight, the Japan-United States Friendship Commission, and the National Bureau of Asian Research.

Meeting and workshop from SAS

saslogoThe Seattle Astronomical Society has a couple of public events on tap for this week. The society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 16 in room A102 of the Physics/Astronomy Building on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. Local astrophotographer Mark de Regt will talk about how he moved from viewing in his yard to doing remote imaging with equipment located in the South Australia desert.

On Sunday the club will host a free public observing skills workshop, “Stargazing in the City,” aimed at helping new and intermediate observers learn and understand the sky. The session will be held at 2 p.m. March 20 at the Theodor Jacobsen Observatory at the UW. Planned topics include how to identify stars and constellations, understanding astronomy lingo, use of binoculars and star charts, star hopping, and what to observe from light-polluted city skies.

Tacoma public night

taslogoThe Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold one of its free public nights at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 19 on the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The topic for the evening will be ancient astronomy. If weather permits society members will be on hand with telescopes for observing as well.

Planetaria

Pacific PlanetariumPacific Planetarium in Bremerton will present its monthly third Friday astronomy talk March 18, with shows at 5 p.m., 6 p.m., and 7 p.m. As of this writing the topic had not been published. Admission at the door is $5. There’s a full slate of shows set for the weekend at the Willard Smith Planetarium at Pacific Science Center. Check the Seattle Astronomy calendar for details.

Art on the Moon

NASA photo.

NASA photo.

The Giant Steps art exhibition and contest continues Saturday and Sunday at Seattle’s King Street Station, where it will be open from noon until 6 p.m. both days. The event challenged students, artists, engineers, architects, designers, and other space enthusiasts to imagine and propose art projects on the surface of the Moon. Their submissions will be on display at the station weekends through the end of March. Admission is $10.

Up in the sky

Venus will pass very close to Neptune on Sunday. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope have other observing highlights for the week.

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Beer and art with your astronomy

This week’s busy Seattle Astronomy calendar includes a new opportunity to mix astronomy and beer, the opening of a spacey art exhibit, and several club events.

Astronomy and beer

PubSciWe’ve been enjoying Astronomy on Tap Seattle for about a year now—in fact, it will celebrate its first birthday March 23—and now there’s another opportunity to enjoy your favorite beverage with your favorite hobby. Pacific Science Center will host one of its PubSci events at 6 p.m. Wednesday, March 2 at Hilliard’s Beer Taproom in Ballard. Matt Tilley, a Ph.D. student at the University of Washington Department of Earth and Space Sciences and Astrobiology Program, will give a talk titled, “The Magnetospheres Of Solar System Planets And Beyond.” Tilley will explain how planetary magnetic fields can be used to explore things light years away and how this matters for the search for life on exoplanets.

Hilliard’s will donate one dollar to the Pacific Science Center for every beer sold at the event, so drink up for a good cause.

Coincidentally enough, Astronomy on Tap is also held in Ballard, at Bad Jimmy’s Brewing Company. This may well make Ballard the astronomy and beer capital of the world. Or at least of Seattle.

Art on the Moon

NASA photo.

NASA photo.

An out-of-this-world art exhibit will open with a gala party at 6 p.m. Thursday, March 3 at King Street Station in Seattle. Vital 5 Productions cooked up the idea for the Giant Steps exhibition and contest to challenge students, artists, engineers, architects, designers, and other space enthusiasts to imagine and propose art projects on the surface of the Moon. The one deemed best by a panel of judges will be worth $10,000 to its creator.

Tickets to the opening are $25 and are available online. The organizers suggest your shiniest costumes, though space helmets are optional. If you can’t make the big shindig, you can see the exhibit for $10 from noon until 6 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays during March.

Planetariums this week

Pacific Planetarium in Bremerton will present its First Friday Sky Walk show this Friday, March 4, running every half hour between 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. The show takes a look at what objects will be visible in the night sky during the month. Tickets are $3 and are available online or at the door. For those coming from the east side of the sound, the planetarium is less than a mile from the Bremerton ferry terminal.

The Willard Smith Planetarium at Pacific Science Center has a full slate of shows for a variety of ages on Saturdays and Sundays. Check their calendar, or ours, for the schedule. Planetarium shows are $3 in addition to regular Science Center admission.

Astro club events

It’s a busy week for area astronomy clubs.

The Eastside Astronomical Society will meet at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 29 at the Willard Geer Planetarium at Bellevue College. Patricia Terhune-Inverso, longtime EAS member and astronomy instructor at the college, will demonstrate how she uses the planetarium to teach her daily classes. The Eastside Astronomical Society started out as Friends of the Planetarium back in the early 1970s. Check out the interesting history article on the club’s website.

SpokaneThe monthly meeting of the Spokane Astronomical Society will be held at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 4 in the planetarium in Science Building #28 at Spokane Falls Community College. Program details had not been published as of this writing.

The monthly meeting of the Tacoma Astronomical Society will be at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 1 in room 175 of Thompson Hall at the University of Puget Sound. We didn’t have information about the program as of this writing.

taslogoTacoma also will hold one of its free public nights at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 5 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. There will be a presentation about binocular astronomy and, weather permitting, astronomers and telescopes will be ready to observe the night sky.

Up in the sky

Jupiter is nearing opposition and so now is a good time to observe the largest of the planets and its Galilean moons. The Moon passes close to Saturn on Wednesday. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope have other observing highlights for the week.

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Busy Presidents Day week ahead

Happy Presidents Day from Seattle Astronomy. We celebrate the birthdays of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln this week. Perhaps, though, we should observe Astronomers Day, because some big-name birthdays fall this week as well. Nicholas Copernicus was born Feb. 19, 1473—he would be 543—and Galileo was born Feb. 15, 1564—452 years ago this day. Maybe it is because of these two most important scientists that there are so many great astronomy events on the calendar this week!

Show me a rose

Rose City AstronomersWe’re planning a road trip to Portland, where the Rose City Astronomers will hold their monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 15 at the OMSI auditorium. Dr. Gregory Bothun of the University of Oregon will give a talk titled, “Astronomy, Big Data, and the Future.” The premise: we’re collecting astronomical data at an astronomically increasing pace, but human processing and thinking about all of this information can’t keep up. Is astronomy in danger of becoming a “pixel archive science?”

Silent Sky and These Things Abide

Silent SkyTaproot Theatre in Greenwood continues its run of Silent Sky, Lauren Gunderson‘s play about astronomer Henrietta Leavitt, through Feb. 27. This Tuesday, Feb. 16 at 7:30 p.m. the theatre will host a special conversation with the play’s director, Karen Lund, and Adrian Wyard of the Counterbalance Foundation as they discuss the search for truth by both science and religion, the history of the conversation between faith and science, and the possibilities for future dialogue. It’s free, but seating is limited, so contact the theatre if you wish to attend.

Watch for a post about our conversation with Wyard coming soon!

Decisions, decisions

There are two good events coming up on Wednesday, Feb. 17, but alas, you can only be in one place at a time, unless this whole multiverse thing is true.

AOT SeattleThe fine folks from Astronomy on Tap Seattle, organized by astronomy graduate students from the University of Washington, will host their monthly confab of astronomy, trivia, prizes, and beer at 7 p.m. at Bad Jimmy’s Brewing Company in Ballard. This month UW astronomer Dr. John Parejko will give a talk titled, “Detect the Ancient Universe Like a BOSS,” and Dr. Fabio Governato will speak about “Dark Matter, Black Holes and other reasons to work with NASA’s fastest supercomputer: Pleiades.” It’s free, but bring beer money.

Meanwhile the Seattle Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday in room A102 of the Physics/Astronomy Building on the UW campus in Seattle. Astronomy Ph.D. student Phoebe Upton Sanderbeck will give a presentation about how measuring the temperature of the universe can help us understand its development.

Saturn’s moons of promise

Pacific PlanetariumPacific Planetarium in Bremerton will feature its monthly third Friday astronomy talk this Friday, Feb. 19 with hourly presentations at 5 p.m., 6 p.m., and 7 p.m. NASA Solar System Ambassador Ron Hobbs will share the latest findings about the environments on Saturn’s moons Enceledus and Titan, where liquid water and methane flow, which might provide the necessary conditions for life to develop. Tickets are $5 and are available at the door or in advance online.

The Mercury 13

Mercury 13Sally Ride became the first American woman in space when she flew on a space shuttle mission in 1983. More than two decades earlier 13 U.S. women were training for flight in the Woman in Space program. Of course, the Mercury 13 never got off the ground. At 2 p.m. this Saturday, Feb. 20 at the Museum of Flight aviation expert Philip Tartalone will explore the genesis of the Woman in Space Program, the personalities involved, the testing, and the social mores of the early 1960s that ultimately doomed the program. The presentation is free with admission to the Museum.

Up in the sky

Jupiter will be at opposition next month, but it’s already placed pretty well for viewing in the late evening these days. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope have other observing highlights for the week.

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Astronaut visit, three club meetings this week

A talk by a visiting astronaut and three astronomy club meetings highlight the week on the Seattle Astronomy calendar, and two of the week’s featured events are on the west side of Puget Sound.

Astronaut Wilson speaks at MOF program

Stephanie Wilson

Astronaut Stephanie Wilson. Photo: NASA.

Astronaut Stephanie Wilson, the second African-American woman to travel to space, will give a talk at 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 6 at the Museum of Flight. Wilson, who flew on three shuttle missions, appears in recognition of Black History Month and in conjunction with the Michael P. Anderson Memorial Aerospace Program, named after the Washington native astronaut who died in the space shuttle Columbia tragedy. The program brings in mentors for at-risk students and gives them exposure to aerospace education, improving their chances to graduate from high school.

The talk is free with admission to the museum.

Astronomy clubs meet

Three area astronomy clubs have their regular meetings scheduled this week.

The Olympic Astronomical Society gathers at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 1 in room Art 103 on the Olympic College campus in Bremerton. The club has a half-dozen interesting talks on its agenda for the evening.

Tacoma Astronomical Society will meet at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 2 in room 175 of  Thompson Hall on the campus of the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma. Popular speaker Ron Hobbs, a NASA JPL Solar System Ambassador, will give a talk about the DAWN mission to Ceres.

The Spokane Astronomical Society plans its monthly meeting for 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 5 in the planetarium at Spokane Falls Community College. Guest speaker and program information hadn’t been published as of this writing.

First Friday Sky Walk

Pacific PlanetariumIf you haven’t checked out Pacific Planetarium in Bremerton, this Friday would be a good time to do so. The planetarium presents a First Friday Sky Walk each month, with the next being on Feb. 5. These family-friendly presentations give a look at what’s up in the night sky for the coming month. The first show is at 5 p.m. and it is repeated hourly through 8 p.m. Before or after shows you can explore the planetarium’s space science exhibits and activities. Volunteers from the Olympic Astronomical Society will be present to answer your astronomy questions.

Tickets are $3 and are available online or at the door. For those coming from the east side of the sound, the planetarium is less than a mile from the Bremerton ferry terminal.

Up in the sky

The Moon passes near Mars, Saturn, and Venus this week as the early-morning lineup of planets continues. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope have other observing highlights for the week.

Follow the Seattle Astronomy calendar to keep up to date on astronomy happenings in the area.

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