Tag Archives: Richard Maurer

Apollo 11 50th anniversary reading list

I’m giving a series of six talks this summer at various branches of Tacoma Public Library about the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission and the first humans to walk on the Moon. It’s part of the library’s summer reading club. My talk includes some suggested reading about Apollo. Here’s what I recommend:

A lot of the material for my talk came from James Donovan‘s excellent book Shoot for the Moon: The Space Race and the extraordinary Voyage of Apollo 11 (Little, Brown and Company, 2019). Apollo 11 command module pilot Michael Collins calls the book “The best book on Apollo that I have read.”

Shoot for the Moon takes us on a tour of the space race from Sputnik up through the Apollo missions. Marvelously detailed and highly accessible, I could hardly put it down. It’s a marvelous chronicle of this great adventure.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library

Seattle Public Library


Rod Pyle‘s First on the Moon: The Apollo 11 50th Anniversary Experience (Sterling, 2019) includes a forward by the mission’s Buzz Aldrin, second man to walk on the Moon. It’s a beautifully illustrated volume that is a fitting commemoration of Apollo 11.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library (N/A)

Seattle Public Library


Charles Fishman‘s One Giant Leap: The Impossible Mission That Flew Us to the Moon (somebody, 2019) focuses on many of the people behind the scenes—technicians, engineers, scientists—who made the Moon landing possible. About 400,000 people in all worked on some aspect of the Apollo missions.

Fishman gave a talk about the book June 28 at Town Hall Seattle but unfortunately I wasn’t able to attend. The book is next on my nightstand, though.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library

Seattle Public Library


David Whitehouse‘s Apollo 11: The Inside Story (Icon Books, 2019) is based on the author’s interviews with a host of astronauts, NASA personnel, politicians, and other insiders to tell the tale about how Apollo came about.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library (N/A)

Seattle Public Library (N/A)

 


Richard Maurer‘s Destination Moon: The Remarkable and Improbable Voyage of Apollo 11 (Roaring Book Press, 2019) goes back in time. While most tales about the space race start with Sputnik, Maurer begins with fighter pilots in World War II. He traces the origins of the Apollo program to a few exceptional soldiers, a Nazi engineer, and a young eager man who would become president.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library

Seattle Public Library


The Space Race: The Journey to the Moon and Beyond (DK Children, 2019) by Sarah Cruddas is targeted for kids from ages 6–9 and takes them from the race to the Moon to the future and the possibility of perhaps one day living on Mars.

The Space Race includes a forward by Eileen Collins, the first women to be commander of a space shuttle mission.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library

Seattle Public Library


Two books by John M. Logsdon, founder and long-time director of the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University, wrap up our list. They’re not new, but both offer interesting discussions of the public policy debates behind the Space Race and how the decisions changed the future of U.S. space exploration.

John F. Kennedy and the Race to the Moon (Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology, 2010) and After Apollo?: Richard Nixon and the American Space Program (Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology, 2015) are great reads for those interested in public policy and how challenging decisions are made. The books are relevant now as we observe the anniversary of Apollo, and as we consider the pros and cons of a return to the Moon and possible future missions to Mars.

Check out our 2015 article about Logsdon’s discussion of the future of space exploration given at that winter’s meeting of the American Astronomical Society.


Books marked at N/A at the library branches were not listed in their catalogs as of June 30, 2019. They may be on the way, as most of the titles are fresh off the presses. If you purchase from Amazon through the links above, a small percentage of the sale comes to Seattle Astronomy at no cost to you. This helps support our work on astronomy journalism.

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