Tag Archives: Theodor Jacobsen Observatory

Equinox sunset watch, Tyson visit highlight week’s calendar

A visit from astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, the final Jacobsen Observatory open house of the year, and a seasonal sunset watch are the highlights of this week’s calendar of astro-events in the Seattle area.

Tyson, director of the Haden Planetarium in New York, narrator of the recent Cosmos television series, author, and host of the StarTalk radio show and podcast, will speak at Seattle’s Paramount Theatre on two nights this week, Wednesday, September 21 and Thursday, September 22, both at 7:30 p.m. Some tickets are still available for both appearances.

Ring in autumn

AlicesAstroInfo-145Join Alice Enevoldsen of Alice’s Astro Info at Solstice Park in West Seattle at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, September 22 to enjoy the first sunset of autumn. The equinox sunset watch will be Enevoldsen’s thirtieth such event, part of her NASA Solar System Ambassador service. The event is free, low-key, and always informative.

TJO wraps its season

Theodor Jacobsen ObservatoryThe final open house of the year is set for 8 p.m. Wednesday, September 21 at the Theodor Jacobsen Observatory on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. The talk for the evening, reservations for which are already all spoken for, will be by student Anya Raj, who has been interning with NRAO-NM over the summer and who has built a dual-dipole radio telescope. Raj will talk about amateur radio astronomy and making your own radio telescope. Volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society will be on hand in the observatory dome to conduct tours and, if the sky is clear, offer looks through its vintage telescope.

The popular open house series will be on hiatus for the fall and winter and will resume in April.

Club events

Seattle Astronomical SocietyThe Seattle Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, September 21 in room A102 of the Physics/Astronomy Building on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. Guest speaker Ethan Kruse, a graduate student in astronomy at the UW, will talk about Proxima Centauri b, the exoplanet recently found orbiting our nearest stellar neighbor. Kruse will discuss how much we know about the planet right now, and what we might learn in the coming years.

By way of preview, check our articles about a talk by Kruse at an Astronomy on Tap Seattle event from earlier this year, and about a presentation by Prof. Rory Barnes at Pacific Science Center last month exploring the potential habitability of the planet.

Tacoma Astronomical SocietyThe Tacoma Astronomical Society plans one of its public nights for 9 p.m. Saturday, September 24 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The indoor presentation will be about the reasons for the seasons as we shift into fall. Weather permitting, club members will have telescopes out for looking at the sky.

Futures file

You can scout out future astronomy events on our calendar. New additions to the calendar this week include:

  • World Space Week events October 4–7 at the UW Planetarium
  • The BP Astro Kids November 12 look at the craters of the Moon

Up in the sky

The ice giants Uranus and Neptune are well-placed for observing this week. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope offer additional observing highlights for the week.

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Labor Day week astronomy events

Happy Labor Day to all! There’s a little something on the astronomy calendar just about every night this week.

Focus on astrophotography

Tacoma Astronomical SocietyThe Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, September 7 in room 175 of Thompson Hall on the University of Puget Sound campus in Tacoma. The meeting topic will be DSLR photography, with four experienced shooters and two beginners sharing their tips and challenges. The club hopes to spur wider interest in the pursuit of astrophotography.

TAS will also hold one of its public nights beginning at 9 p.m. Saturday, September 10 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The indoor program will be about the Hubble Space Telescope. Club members will be on hand with scopes for public viewing, weather permitting.

Last month for Jacobsen open houses

Theodor Jacobsen ObservatoryThe second-to-last open house of the season at the University of Washington’s Theodor Jacobsen Observatory will be held at 8 p.m. Wednesday, September 7. Recent physics and astronomy graduate Evan Davis will give a talk about exoplanets. With the recent strong evidence of a planet orbiting the nearest star, Proxima Centauri, Davis’s talk is especially relevant! Reservations are recommended.

After the September 21 open house, the outreach program will go on hiatus until March.

Astronomy clubs

beaslogo_300The Boeing Employees Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, September 8 at the Boeing “Oxbow” Recreation center. The topic or guest speaker was yet to be announced as of this writing. Non-Boeing guests are welcome, but should RSVP to Dave Ingram, contact info on the meeting link above.

Spokane Astronomical SocietyThe Spokane Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Friday, September 9 at the Riverview Retirement Community in Spokane. The guest speaker will be Don Peckham, a member of Rose City Astronomers who has been assistant director of the club’s telescope workshop since 2005. Peckham created the String Telescope Concepts and the Tensegrity String Telescope websites. He has designed and built two truss-tube telescopes, two traditional string telescopes, and three tensegrity string telescopes.

BPAA logoSaturday will be a busy night on Bainbridge Island as the Battle Point Astronomical Association holds several events. Its BP Astro Kids programs at 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. September 10 will look at comets and help kids make their own. The planetarium program at 7:30 p.m. will take a look at cool Hubble Space Telescope images you may have missed. Observing will happen, weather permitting.

Seattle Astronomical SocietyThe Seattle Astronomical Society will hold its monthly free public star parties at 8 p.m. Saturday, September 10 at two locations: Green Lake in Seattle and Paramount Park in Shoreline. The star parties are cancelled in the event of weather unfavorable for astronomical observing. Watch the SAS website for the latest.

Above and Beyond closes

MOFIt’s your last week to check out the special exhibit Above and Beyond at the Museum of Flight. The interactive traveling exhibit celebrates both the history and future of flight through a variety of immersive simulations, interactive design challenges, impactful stories of innovation, and more. This large-scale exhibition invites you to experience what it takes to make the “impossible” possible. The last day to experience it is September 10. It’s free with museum admission.

Futures file

You can scout out future astronomy events on our calendar. New additions this week include:

  • Astronaut Mike Massimino will speak at the Museum of Flight October 14
  • Author Julian Guthrie and others will talk about the Road to SpaceShipOne at the Museum of Flight October 17
  • Physicist Rainer Weiss, a key figure in gravitational wave research, will lecture at the University of Washington October 25

Up in the sky

Spot the Moon near Saturn Thursday and Mars Friday. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope have more observing highlights for the week.

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Wednesday astronomy at UW

Most of the week’s astronomy activity is focused on a couple of events Wednesday at the University of Washington.

Seattle Astronomical SocietyThe Seattle Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 15 in room A102 of the Physics/Astronomy building on the Seattle campus. Society member John McLaren will give a presentation about solar exploration, covering early human interactions with the Sun and their unexpected impacts on our growing technology. He’ll discuss how we learned about the Sun before the space age, what we’ve since discovered from space-based observing, and what the future holds for solar observations from space. The meeting is open to the public.

TJO goes retrograde

Theodor Jacobsen Observatory

Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

After the SAS gathering you’ll have just enough time to dash up campus to one of the twice-monthly open houses at the Theodor Jacobsen Observatory, which begins at 9 p.m. With both Mars and Saturn in the retrograde parts of their orbits, the observatory director, Dr. Ana Larson, will talk about what that means, will discuss the historical context, and help visitors plot the motion of Mars against the background stars using a star map.

With both planets well placed for viewing, hope for clear skies and at peek at them through the observatory’s vintage telescope, operated by volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society.

Planetaria

The Willard Smith Planetarium at Pacific Science Center has several astronomy shows every day. Check our calendar for the schedule.

Pacific Planetarium in Bremerton will offer public shows on Friday, June 17, with hourly presentations at 5 p.m., 6 p.m., and 7 p.m. The topic will be star hopping: how to explore the heavens using the constellations and stars as a guide. Admission to the shows is $5.

Up in the sky

Jupiter, Mars, and Saturn all remain well placed for evening viewing these days, but there’s plenty more to see. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope have other observing highlights for the week.

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AstronoMay continues at PacSci with two talks this week

Saturday was Astronomy Day, but the Pacific Science Center is taking the whole month to celebrate AstronoMay! Two interesting talks highlight the calendar for the week.

Brett Morris

Brett Morris

Brett Morris, one of the co-founders of Astronomy on Tap Seattle, will give a presentation titled, “Hunting For Life in the Universe” at a Teen Science Café at 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 18 at the center’s PACCAR IMAX Theater. Morris will introduce the science of astrobiology and how it seeks to measure and locate the conditions necessary for life in the universe. He’ll talk about telescopes and techniques used to explore other worlds and to try to track down life on them.

Dr. Will Grundy, the lead investigator for the surface composition team of New Horizons, will give a talk titled, “Pluto and Charon Up-close” at 2:15 p.m. Sunday, May 22 at the PACCAR Theater. Grundy will show close-up images from the mission and discuss his research, which involves icy outer solar system planets, satellites, and Kuiper belt objects using a broad variety of observational, theoretical, laboratory, and space-based techniques.

Volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society will be on hand at the center Saturday and Sunday with solar telescopes for viewing of the Sun. AstronoMay also includes planetarium shows, screenings of the movie A Beautiful Planet 3D, and other activities. Check the AstronoMay calendar page for a full listing.

Club events

saslogoThe Seattle Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 18 in room A102 of the Physics/Astronomy building on the campus of the University of Washington in Seattle. Solar System Ambassador Ron Hobbs will give a talk titled, “Juno to Jupiter: Piercing the Veil.” The Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter in July. Over the ensuing year and a half, it will peer through the Jovian cloud tops and provide a deeper understanding of the composition and structure of the Solar System’s largest planet. Hobbs will explain what exciting science to expect from NASA’s latest outer planet mission.

Rose City AstronomersRose City Astronomers will hold their monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Monday, May 16 at the OMSI auditorium in Portland. It will be the group’s annual astronomy fair, with a swap meet, info booths, and brief show-and-tell sessions.

TJO open house

Theodor Jacobsen ObservatoryThere will be an open house at the University of Washington’s Theodor Jacobsen Observatory at 9 p.m. Wednesday, May 18. Students Cale Lewandowski and Jason Busnardo will be giving a talk about how to overcome the challenges of a trip to Mars. Reservations are strongly recommended for the talks, which are held in a small classroom in the observatory and often fill up early. Volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society will offer tours of the observatory and a look through its vintage telescope if weather permits.

Up in the sky

Mars is nearing opposition and Jupiter remains well placed for observing. This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope magazine and The Sky This Week from Astronomy have other observing highlights for the week.

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AstronoMay kicks off at PacSci

Pacific Science CenterWhy settle for one astronomy day when you can have AstronoMay? Astronomy Day is May 14, but the Pacific Science Center has the whole month packed with astronomy activities. The first is coming up at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, May 5 in the center’s Willard Smith Planetarium, which will hook up with the Adler Planetarium and others around the country for an interactive, networked lecture, “From The Big Bang To The Multiverse And Beyond.” The talk will be given by Dr. Michael Turner of the University of Chicago, a noted cosmologist credited with coining the term dark energy. Turner will delve into what we know and also tackle some of the mysteries and puzzles of cosmology today.

Other lectures planned for AstronoMay:

  • Elena Amador, a UW graduate student in Earth and Space Sciences, presents, “Search for Water on Mars” May 14 at 10 a.m.
  • Dr. Sandeep Singh, planetary scientist at the Bear Fight Institute, presents “Saturn’s Hazy Moon, Titan” May 14 at 2:30 p.m.
  • Dr. Will Grundy of Lowell Observatory presents “Pluto & Charon Up-Close” May 22 at 2:15 p.m.

The lectures are free with admission to the Pacific Science Center, but tickets are required and available online.

On Saturdays during May, and on Sunday, May 22, volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society will be set up on the courtyard of the center with solar telescopes for safe viewing of the Sun. All month long there will be exhibits and hands-on activities about space and astronomy, and planetarium presentations (our calendar has the schedule) and IMAX movies, including A Beautiful Planet 3D.

AstronoMay website and calendar.

Club news

Tacoma Astronomical SocietyArea astronomy clubs are busy this week. The Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 3 in room 175 of Thompson Hall at the University of Puget Sound. There will be a presentation by Michael Laine, president of the Liftport Group, which is drawing up plans for a lunar elevator. The club will hold one of its free public nights at 9 p.m. Saturday, May 7 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The TAS student group will make a presentation about the solar system. Observing will happen if weather permits.

Spokane Astronomical SocietyThe Spokane Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 6 at the planetarium at Spokane Falls Community College. Stefanie Milam, a project scientist with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, will give a presentation on either the James Webb Space Telescope or recent discoveries of sugar and ethanol in comets. They note the latter represents all of the makings for a wild star party.

Olympic Astronomical Society will hold its 12th annual spring Camp Delaney Star Party May 4-8 out at Sun Lakes State Park near Coulee City in Eastern Washington. Club members already on site recommend industrial strength bug protection as the mosquitos are out in force. Note the preregistration was required for the event.

Supernova impostor

Brianna Binder

Breanna Binder. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

Dr. Breanna Binder of the University of Washington will give an astronomy colloquium at 4 p.m. Thursday, May 5 in the Physics/Astronomy Auditorium on the UW campus in Seattle. Binder will talk about supernova 2010da, which is not really a supernova, but an interesting object with a high-luminosity, variable X-ray emission. The X-ray emission is consistent with accretion onto a neutron star, making SN 2010da both a supernova impostor and likely high mass X-ray binary. Binder gave a talk about x-ray binary systems last August at the Seattle Astronomical Society’s monthly meeting.

Space Day at Museum of Flight

moflogoThursday is not only Cinco de Mayo, it is Space Day at the Museum of Flight. It’s part of the Museum’s free first Thursday from 5 p.m. until 9 p.m. Local astronomy clubs will be on hand with information, and telescopes for observing if weather permits.

Open House at TJO

There will be an open house at the University of Washington’s Theodor Jacobsen Observatory at 9 p.m. Wednesday, May 4. As of this writing the schedule for the events talks by undergraduate students had not been published online. Volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society will be on hand to offer observatory tours, and perhaps a peek through its vintage six-inch 1892 Warner and Swasey telescope with Brashear objective.

Up in the sky

The Eta Aquarid meteor shower peaks this week. Learn about the shower and other observing highlights for the week from This Week’s Sky at a Glance by Sky & Telescope magazine or The Sky This Week from Astronomy.

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Jacobsen Observatory open houses resume

The blooming of the daffodils and the return of the robin may be time-honored signs of the beginning of spring, but our favorite harbinger is the resumption of semimonthly open houses at the University of Washington’s Theodor Jacobsen Observatory. The first one of the spring will be held beginning at 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 6 at the observatory.

Theodor Jacobsen Observatory

The Theodor Jacobsen Observatory is the second oldest building on the campus of the University of Washington in Seattle. Twice-monthly open houses at the observatory resume April 6. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

Each open house features astronomy talks by undergraduate students, tours of the observatory, and, if the weather permits, views through its vintage 1890s telescope operated by volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society.

The open houses have become one of Seattle’s hottest tickets. The classroom in which they’re held is small, and so advance reservations are a must for the free talks. Dr. Ana Larson, the observatory director, said that there’s often a lengthy waiting list.

Larson said the open houses started around 2002 and were staffed by students who volunteered to give talks. Now the speakers are students from Larson’s course ASTR 270—Public Outreach in Astronomy.

“We started this class a few years after that to actually give the undergraduates who were spending all of that volunteer time credit for doing it,” Larson said. About a third of the students in the course are science majors, but a wide range of different majors are involved. Students learn how to give effective scientific presentations, how to develop and present educational programs to school-age groups, and how to communicate knowledge of astronomy to others. They give talks at the observatory and at the university’s planetarium.

“We’re looking at a pretty good season,” Larson said, noting that she’s still piecing together the schedule for talks. The course is an elective, so students enrolled in it are enthusiastic about the opportunity.

“They’re doing something they enjoy and keeping with it,” Larson said. “That, as you know, is why astronomy is such a cool science; anybody can do it.”

“You don’t need to be Neil deGrasse Tyson,” she added, “but you need to be able to express [the science] in understandable terms.”

You can make reservations for Wednesday’s talk online. Student Lev Marcus will talk about Jupiter’s moons, with a focus on the Galilean moons and current research about them.

Club news

The Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 5 in room 175 of Thompson Hall on the campus of the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma. They’ll be viewing a video about nucleosynthesis.

The Battle Point Astronomical Association will hold its monthly planetarium shows and observing this Saturday, April 9 at the John Rudolph Planetarium and Edwin Ritchie Observatory at Battle Point Park on Bainbridge Island. Kids can make their own telescopes at 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. BPAstro Kids presentations, then at 7:30 p.m. the program will be “NASA’s Other Great Observatories.” Everyone knows about Hubble; this program will take a look at NASA’s other three great observatories: the Spitzer, the Chandra, and the Compton. Suggested donation $2, $5 for families, free for BPAA members.

Up in the sky

Jupiter is just past opposition and Mars is growing brighter by the day. Both are great observing targets. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope offer other observing highlights for the week.

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Observatory open house, TAS meeting this week

Happy September! It’s a pretty light week on the calendar, though we will get to enjoy a club meeting and an observatory open house as Labor Day approaches.

taslogoTonight is the night for the monthly meeting of the Tacoma Astronomical Society, which welcomes our friends from Cloud Break Optics, who will visit to talk about useful telescope mounts for public star parties and outreach. The meeting begins at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 1 at the University of Puget Sound’s Thompson Hall, room 175.

TJO winding down

TJO

Theodor Jacobsen Observatory at the UW. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

On Wednesday, Sept. 2 the University of Washington hosts an open house at the Theodor Jacobsen Observatory on the Seattle campus. As we move into September, the start time for the bi-monthly open house moves up to 8 p.m. Physics and astronomy student Mallory Thorpe will lead a discussion titled “The Planet Club.” Thorpe will talk about how the definition of a planet has changed over the years, covering the discovery of Neptune, exoplanets, and the controversy around Pluto’s planetary status. These talks at the TJO open houses have become about the hottest ticket in town. Today’s talk is full and has a lengthy wait list as well. The talk for the next open house on Sept. 16 is also full, and that will be the last one of the year. Even without a reservation for the talk, you’ll have a chance to tour the observatory dome and, weather permitting, peek through the vintage telescope, operated by volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society.

The ice giants are out

The ice giant planets are near the top of our observing list for the week. Neptune is at opposition Sept. 1 and well-placed for viewing. Uranus will be easier to spot, as it will appear barely one degree north of the Moon this evening. Binoculars or a telescope are a big help on both, though some eagle-eyes claim to be able to spot Uranus, in particular, without magnification. Check out Astronomy magazine’s The Sky This Week for more observing highlights for the week.

Future file

bigbangThe University of Washington Astronomy Department is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year with a string of lectures and events that begins next month. The talks feature UW faculty members and guest astronomers, and a special multimedia concert is on the docket, too. Check our post about the celebration for the low-down on all of the events, and watch our calendar to find other interesting local astronomy activities.

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