Tag Archives: Willard Smith Planetarium

Calendar: Watch and hear a lecture from Adler

There’s a full Moon on Saturday and Daylight Saving Time ends on Sunday. Maybe that’s why the astronomy calendar is a little sparse this week!

Are we alone in the universe?

Thousands of exoplanets have been discovered over the past two decades. Dr. Lisa Kaltenegger, Director of the Carl Sagan Institute at Cornell University and an associate professor in Cornell’s astronomy department, will discuss these discoveries during a lecture at 5:30 p.m. Friday, November 3 at Adler Planetarium in Chicago. You don’t have to be in the Windy City to attend; the lecture is part of the bi-annual Kavli Fulldome Lecture Series and will be live streamed to the Pacific Science Center’s Willard Smith Planetarium! It’s part of the center’s on-going Science in the City lecture series. Kaltenegger will explore how we can determine which exoplanets might be suitable for life and cover techniques and missions that could detect life on these faraway worlds.

Tickets are $5, and free to science center members. Space is limited, so advance tickets are recommended.

Club meetings

The Spokane Astronomical Society will meet at 7:30 p.m. Friday, November 3 at the planetarium at Spokane Falls Community College. The guest speaker had not been published as of this writing.

The Seattle Astronomical Society will offer one of its new members orientation sessions at 2 p.m. Sunday, November 5 at the Theodor Jacobsen Observatory on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. While the title calls out “new members,” prospective members are welcome as well. It’s a good time to find out what the society has to offer—and sign up!

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Club events and planetarium shows on tap for this week

The first weekend in December is heavy with club events, star parties, and planetarium shows. Here’s what’s on the calendar for the coming week:

Club gatherings

Spokane Astronomical SocietyIn December many astronomy clubs opt out of a formal meeting and instead hold a banquet or other more social gathering. The Spokane Astronomical Society plans its annual potluck dinner for 6 p.m. Friday, December 2 at the Riverview Retirement Community. A guest speaker will follow the dinner at 7:30. Dr. John Buchanan, a professor of geology at Eastern Washington University, will talk about catastrophic outburst flooding that have occurred on Earth and Mars through geologic time. He will examine how the “Ice Age Floods” in eastern Washington compare with various large floods both on Earth and Mars.

Seattle Astronomical SocietyThe Seattle Astronomical Society plans its free monthly public star parties for 6 p.m. Saturday, December 3 at two locations: Green Lake in Seattle and Paramount Park in Shoreline. Poor weather will mean cancellation of the events, so watch the club’s website and social media for updates.

Tacoma Astronomical SocietyThe Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold one of its free public nights at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, December 3 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The all-weather program will be about selecting gift telescopes, binoculars, and other astronomy gear. (We covered that topic, too last week!) If the weather is good they’ll also put their gear into action for some celestial observing.

Planetarium shows

Planetaria have no trouble with cloudy weather! There are several shows on the docket for the week.

The University of Washington planetarium will host three free shows on Friday, December 2 at 5:30, 6:30, and 7:30 p.m. Reservations for all three times were snapped up quickly, but you can watch this site to see if tickets become available.

Pacific Planetarium in Bremerton will host its First Friday Sky Walk shows December 2, with a presentation every half-hour between 5 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. The shows look at what’s up in the sky for the coming month.

There are a variety of shows suitable for all ages every day at the Willard Smith Planetarium at the Pacific Science Center. You’ll find their complete schedule on our calendar page.

Futures file

You can scout out future astronomy events on our calendar. New additions to the calendar this week include:

Up in the sky

Venus and the Moon make a nice pairing on the evening of December 3. This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope magazine and The Sky This Week from Astronomy offer more observing highlights for the week.

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Answering What If? Friday in Bremerton

Planetarium events and a handful of astronomy club functions highlight the astronomy calendar for this week.

Pacific Planetarium in Bremerton plans shows titled “What If?” this Friday, July 15 at 5 p.m., 6 p.m., and 7 p.m. The sessions will take on some of the queries posed in the book What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014) by Randall Munroe, the former NASA scientist turned cartoonist and creator of the comic xkcd. Admission to the programs is $5.

For those traveling to the planetarium from the east side of the sound, it is less than a mile from the Bremerton ferry terminal. Save the car fare and walk on!

Pacific Science CenterThe Willard Smith Planetarium at Pacific Science Center features daily programs on a variety of topics, and they have offerings suitable for all ages. Check our calendar, or theirs, for the schedule.

Astronomy club events

Olympic Astronomical SocietyThe Olympic Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Monday, July 11 in room Art 103 at Olympic College in Bremerton. Talks on the agenda will cover the summer night sky, explosions in space, and core collapse super novae.

beaslogo_300The Boeing Employees Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting Thursday, July 14 in the Boeing “Oxbow” Recreation Center, Building 9-150, Room 201. The program will be “Juno to Jupiter: Piercing the Veil,” a presentation by solar system ambassador Ron Hobbs about the Juno mission, which arrived at Jupiter last week. A social half hour begins at 6:30 p.m. with the program slated for 7 p.m. All Boeing employees, friends and family are invited. Non-Boeing guests must be escorted, so please RSVP to BEAS president David Ingram.

You can get a preview of the program by reading our recent article with Hobbs or listening to the podcast directly below.

Tacoma Astronomical SocietyThe Tacoma Astronomical Society plans one of its free public nights for 9 p.m. Saturday, July 16 at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. The all-weather program will cover constellations and star-hopping. If the skies are clear club members will be on hand with telescopes for observing.

Up in the sky

Mercury and Venus will be very close together while Saturn and the Moon do a little dance on Friday. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance by Sky & Telescope have more observing highlights for the week.

 

 

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Wednesday astronomy at UW

Most of the week’s astronomy activity is focused on a couple of events Wednesday at the University of Washington.

Seattle Astronomical SocietyThe Seattle Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 15 in room A102 of the Physics/Astronomy building on the Seattle campus. Society member John McLaren will give a presentation about solar exploration, covering early human interactions with the Sun and their unexpected impacts on our growing technology. He’ll discuss how we learned about the Sun before the space age, what we’ve since discovered from space-based observing, and what the future holds for solar observations from space. The meeting is open to the public.

TJO goes retrograde

Theodor Jacobsen Observatory

Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

After the SAS gathering you’ll have just enough time to dash up campus to one of the twice-monthly open houses at the Theodor Jacobsen Observatory, which begins at 9 p.m. With both Mars and Saturn in the retrograde parts of their orbits, the observatory director, Dr. Ana Larson, will talk about what that means, will discuss the historical context, and help visitors plot the motion of Mars against the background stars using a star map.

With both planets well placed for viewing, hope for clear skies and at peek at them through the observatory’s vintage telescope, operated by volunteers from the Seattle Astronomical Society.

Planetaria

The Willard Smith Planetarium at Pacific Science Center has several astronomy shows every day. Check our calendar for the schedule.

Pacific Planetarium in Bremerton will offer public shows on Friday, June 17, with hourly presentations at 5 p.m., 6 p.m., and 7 p.m. The topic will be star hopping: how to explore the heavens using the constellations and stars as a guide. Admission to the shows is $5.

Up in the sky

Jupiter, Mars, and Saturn all remain well placed for evening viewing these days, but there’s plenty more to see. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope have other observing highlights for the week.

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Lots of astronomy club activity this week

There’s a lot of activity on the calendar with area astronomy clubs this week, including five different events on Saturday.

The Boeing Employees Astronomical Society starts things off with its regular meeting Thursday. Social hour at the Boeing Oxbow fitness center will begin at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 11, with the meeting following at 7 p.m. The program will be a presentation about “Saturn’s Magnificent Moons and Rings.”

People who do not work at Boeing can attend, but should follow info here to RSVP and gain admission.

Busy Saturday

The Everett Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 13 at the Evergreen Branch of the Everett Public Library. As of this writing the program topic had not been published.

saslogoThe Seattle Astronomical Society plans its free monthly public star parties for 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 13 at two locations: Green Lake in Seattle and Paramount Park in Shoreline. Bad weather cancels the star parties, so watch the society’s website for updates.

BPAAThe Battle Point Astronomical Association will run a Valentine’s-themed planetarium program at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at its Ritchie Observatory in Battle Point Park on Bainbridge Island. The program, “Star Stories: Twisted Tales of Love & Loss” will explore tales from ancient star lore. If the weather permits astronomers will be on hand with telescopes for some observing. A kids’ show and the building of “Love Bots” will precede the main show at 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. Free to BPAA members, suggested $2 donation for non-members, $5 for families.

taslogoThe Tacoma Astronomical Society will hold one of its free public nights at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at the Fort Steilacoom campus of Pierce College. An all-weather presentation will look at “110 Celestial Objects.” It sounds like a review of the Messier catalog. Observing will follow, weather permitting.

Check our calendar for more planetarium events; we’ve recently added information about programs at the Willard Smith Planetarium at Pacific Science Center and at the WSU Planetarium in Pullman.

Up in the sky

The Moon passes near both Neptune and Uranus this week. The Sky This Week from Astronomy magazine and This Week’s Sky at a Glance from Sky & Telescope have other observing highlights for the week.

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